Saturday - July 30, 1927

 

 

 

Winfield Daily Courier
Wednesday, July 27, 1927, Front Page:

AUTO  RACES  SATURDAY
Horses to be Followed Saturday by Auto Speed Events

Henry F. Williams

Auto races will be put on Saturday of this week following the horse races.  This is a new feature for Winfield.  There have been few auto races here for a number of years.  Many of men drive especially built racing cars and go like the wind.  The races are for 7 ½ miles, or fifteen times around the Winfield track.

There will be thrills a plenty, according to Don C. Onley, of San Antonio, who with his partner, W. W. Bowen of San Antonio, is promoting the races.  These cars sweep up to about 70 miles an hour but, of course, have to slow down when they make the turns.  It takes skill and training to drive a fast race on a half-mile track.  However, there is one driver who has only one arm.  He is Henry Williams of Wichita Falls, Texas.  He is skillful.  He must be as must all other race drivers for not only are they taxed to control their own cars but the fate of other drivers depends upon them.  Williams has been racing for the past fifteen years.

Each car carries a special number.  These numbers are painted on the cars.

On Saturday, there will be amusing stunts between races.  Auto polo will be one of the stunts as will pushball.  The huge push ball was shown in the business section of Winfield today.  The dangers which once attended auto racing and auto polo have been eliminated to a great extend.  The polo cars have been equipped with guards which make it impossible for the cars to roll over on the drivers.

Of the fifteen entries for the six races Saturday, seven are from Arkansas City, Kansas.

 

 

 

Winfield Daily Courier
Thursday, July 28, 1927, Page 8:

AUTO RACERS TO BE SEEN HERE
IN RACES SATURDAY

Added Day of Racing to Come Soon; Fifteen Signed Up

Saturday will supplement the four-day horse race meeting at the fairgrounds with a six-event auto speed program which will close the weeks racing events with a bang of thrills.

Fifteen entries have signed for the weekend program and include many of the noted drivers and cars in this part of the country:

Name

Hometown

Car #

Car

Car Owner

Charles Lebsack

Wichita, Kansas

K-1

Frontenac

Leonard Kerbs

Earl Hovenden

Arkansas City, Kansas

2

Chevrolet Special

Dwight Moody1

Andrew Fuller 2

Arkansas City, Kansas

4

Frontenac

Andrew Fuller2

Fred Lentz 9

Hutchinson, Kansas

5

Dodge Special

Fred Lentz

Henry “Wingey” Williams

Wichita Falls, Texas

11

Chevrolet Special

Wichita Falls, Texas

Harley Wells

Miami, Oklahoma

27

Frontenac

Harley Wells

Roy Rinehart 3

Arkansas City, Kansas

33

Laurel Special

Roy Hume4

Joe Hutchinson 5

Arkansas City, Kansas

44

Chevrolet Special

Joe Hutchinson5

Forest O’Bannon 6

Arkansas City, Kansas

45

Chevrolet Special

Forest O’Bannon6

Ted Hill

Arkansas City, Kansas

51

Buick Special

Ted Hill

George Roberts

Arkansas City, Kansas

66

Chevrolet Special

Ralph Moody1

Bob Donica 7

Tulsa, Oklahoma

100

Rajo Special

 

Ralph Palmer

San Antonio, Texas

300

Sunbeam Special

 

Art Hutchins

Joplin, Missouri

400

Frontenac

George Hutchins

 

 

500

 

George Hutchins

Roy O’Laughlin

Hutchinson, Kansas

7-11

Frontenac

Roy O’Laughlin

 

The boys from Arkansas City have been showing some lightning speed in the races during the present season and carried off $1,100 of the $1,500 prize money at Cushing, Okla., July 4, and also took the big end of the prize money at the Anthony, Kansas fair last Saturday.

The races Saturday will consist of six events, the longest being the Kansas sweepstakes, a 25-lap race free for all cars on the track.  The other races on the card are 15 laps and limited to six starters excepting the straw-hat derby which is open for eight starters.  The prize money will run about $1,500 for the six events.

Henry Williams of Wichita Falls, Texas at right, better known in the racing fraternity as “Wingey” Williams, has the distinction of being the only one armed driver in the automobile racing game in the country.  Williams is considered one of the most daring drivers in the racing business and will pilot his Chevrolet Special No. 11 in Saturday’s auto race card at the fairgrounds.  Williams, aside from being credited with being one of the oldest drivers, as he was racing when Barney Oldfield was in the height of his popularity some 15 years ago, and is a grandpa with five grandchildren.

 

 

 

Arkansas City Daily Traveler
Thursday, July 28, 1927 - Front Page:

Speed Demon

Charles Lebsack

 

Roy O'Laughlin

 

Fred Lentz

 

Harley Wells

 Charles Lebsack, of Wichita, holder of four state records on the half-mile oval, including the Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, and Kansas records.  Lebsack will pilot his Frontenac No. 1 in Saturday’s Speed card at Winfield.  He will be one of the chief competitors of the seven Arkansas City racers entered.


7 A. C. Cars in the Races – Local Boys Will Appear On Winfield Card Saturday

The four day house race meet on the Winfield track will be supplanted Saturday with the auto races in which seven local cars and drivers will compete against some of the best known speed artists in this section of the country.

Earl Hovenden, piloting the Dwight Moody Chevrolet No. 2, the winner of the Cushing, Okla. Fourth of July race, heads the list of the local boys entered and it is expected that Hovenden will be hard for the outsiders to defeat.


Have Been Winning

The local Arkansas City drivers carried off $1,100 of the prize money at the Cushing races and also made away with the big end of the purses at Tulsa July 3, and at the Anthony Fair last week.

Of the cars and drivers who will meet the seven local speed aces, Charles Lebsack is favored as a possible winner.  Lebsack hails from Wichita and will pilot the Kerbs Special No. 1 in which he set four state records on a half-mile dirt track including the Kansas state record of 30 seconds flat for the lap.  Roy O’Laughlin of Hutchinson in a Frontenac No. 7-11; Harley Wells of Miami, Okla. in his Frontenac No. 27, the winner of last year’s Cushing race; Art Hutchins in Rajo No. 400, of Joplin and Fred Lentz of Hutchinson in a Dodge special, are also among the favorites to carry off the liberal purse money.


A Crippled Driver

Another entry of interest is that of Henry Williams of Wichita Falls, Tex.  Williams has been a pilot of the roaring road for more than 15 years and was driving at the time Barney Oldfield was at the height of his popularity.  Williams, more popularly know among the racing fans as “Wingey”, had the misfortune a few years ago, to lose the use of his right arm, but though handicapped thus, he has a long list of winnings to his credit and is considered one of the most capable and daring drivers in the auto racing game today.

The prize money for the race Saturday will be a percent of the gates and is expected to amount to about $1,500 or more, divided over a program of six events, the feature race being the Kansas Sweepstakes, a 25-mile event free-for-all cars and carrying half of the purse of the day in four prizes.


Polo and Push Ball

As an added attraction, auto polo and auto push ball will be played between the Tulsa Reds and the San Antonio Blues.  The auto push ball is considered among the most sensational and hazardous of sports and is something new to local fans.  The game is played with the six specially constructed cars, using a regulation size push ball standing more than six feet in height and containing, when inflated, about 1,000 pounds of air.  The ball used is made in England and costs $550, and weighs about 81 pounds inflated.

Many of the drivers have inspected the half-mile oval at Winfield and pronounced it one of the best half-mile tracks in this part of the country and anticipate that a number of new speed records will be established at the weekend race.  The half-mile course will be watered all night Friday and all forenoon Saturday in order to eliminate as much dust as possible.  A hard rain up to as late as 10 a.m. Saturday morning would greatly benefit the track and would not prevent the races.

The time trials, or qualifying heats, are scheduled to be run at 10 a.m. in order that the afternoon program will start promptly at 2 p.m. with the opening race.

The races are being conducted by Don C. Onley and W. W. Bowen of San Antonio, Tex.  Onley and Bowen conduct the annual race meets at the San Antonio two mile speedway and the Tulsa State Fairground races at Tulsa.

 

 

 

Winfield Daily Courier
Friday, July 29, 1927, Front Page:

AUTO RACES ARE NEXT

Tomorrow afternoon, the four days of horse racing will give way to the four-wheeled speed buggies and the roar of racing cars will fill the fair grounds from early Saturday morning until the finish of the last race tomorrow evening.  Fifteen cars and drivers representing some of the fastest professional speed demons in the southwest will compete in six races.  Seven of the cars and drivers entered in tomorrows speed card are Arkansas City speed aces.  The Ark City boys will meet some stiff competition from the other eight entries as they are the record holding cars of this section of the country.

The speed favorites in Saturdays races slated to defeat the Ark City aggregation, are Charles Lebsack, in Frontenac No. K-1 of Wichita; Roy O’Laughlin in Frontenac No. 7-11 of Hutchinson; Earl Hovenden; Harley Wells in Frontenac No. 27 of Miami, Okla.; Fred Lentz in his Dodge No. 5 of Hutchinson; Ark City Mechanic Joe Hutchinson; Andrew Fuller, wealthy Osage sportsman and clubman; and George Hutchins in Frontenac No. 400 of Joplin, Mo.  Lentz is holder of four state records on the half-mile tracks including Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, and Kansas.  O’Laughlin is the winner of the July 4 race at the Tulsa State Fairgrounds this year; Hovenden is the winner of the Cushing, Okla. July 4 race; Wells is the winner of last year’s annual Cushing, Okla. race; and Hutchinson and Lentz are always considered dangerous rivals.

The qualifying of time trials will be held in the morning and the opening race will start promptly at 2 p.m.  The admission price to the fairgrounds will not be advanced but will be the same for the auto races as is charged for the horse race programs.


Rain Helps Track

The recent rains have settled the fairgrounds half-mile course and have greatly aided in packing it, as the racing cars require a solid track instead of the track with a cushion as is needed for the horse racing.  A hundred, or more, touring cars will be requested to run around the track Saturday morning in order to further pack the course.  Additional rain Friday night, or early Saturday morning, would aid the track further and would not hinder the racing program as scheduled.

Several added features to the speed card tomorrow will be offered between main events.  These will include the auto polo and the sensational game of auto push ball, the Negro drivers’ race and pie and milk drinking contest, and the boy scouts push ball game.  The auto push ball is new to most of the local fans and is played with a large leather push ball standing more than six feet in height.

The fairgrounds and race officials are adding extra guards and attendants to safely care for what is expected to be one of the largest crowds ever had at the local race plant.  Many speed fans from a distance of south Kansas and Oklahoma will be here and Arkansas City is expected to swell the gate receipts by several customers.  The price of admission has not been raised although it is customary to charge more for automobile races.


Program:
  8:00 a.m. – Gates open to public.  Track turned over to drivers for tuning up and practice.

10:00 a.m. – Qualifying, or time trials.  Each car and driver races one lap of the track for official timing to decide position in afternoon events and for purpose of introducing cars and drivers and setting new local, state, and world records.

  2:00 p.m. – Event No. 1 - Class A car race.  Open to six fastest cars as qualified in morning trials.

Distance – 10 laps

Purse divided: 50-30-20

  2:30 p.m. – Event No. 2 – Class B car race.  Open to three non winners of first event and next three fastest qualified cars.  Winner of second and third position in event No. 1 may be used to fill.

Distance – 15 laps

Purse divided: 50-30-20

Added Attraction: Auto push ball between the Tulsa Rods and the San Antonio Blues.

  3:00 p.m. – Event No. 3 – Class C car race.  Three non-winners of event No. 2 and remainder of the field.  Winners of second and third position in event No. 2 may be used to fill.

Distance – 15 laps

Purse divided: 50-30-20

Added Attraction:  Boy Scouts push ball game.

  3:30 p.m. – Event No. 4 – Three cornered match race between three fastest cars as qualified.

Distance – 6 laps

Purse divided:  Winner take all.

Added Attraction:  Colored pie eating and milk drinking race.  Six Ford cars.  Each car makes lap and stops at the tape to eat a full sized pie; second lap they stop and drink a bottle of milk and first car in on the third lap is the winner.

  4:00 p.m. – Event No. 5 – Australian pursuit straw-hat derby.  Each driver is provided with a straw-hat and each is started from the tape three seconds apart, the fastest cars starting last.  If a driver loses his hat, he is eliminated or, if he is passed by another car, he is eliminated.  Flagged at end of ten laps unless there is a winner sooner.

Added Attraction: Auto polo between the Tulsa Rods and the San Antonio Blues.

  5:00 p.m. – Event No. 6 – Kansas sweepstakes.  Main race of the day.  Free for all cars entered.  Half the purse of the entire day is on this race divided 50-25-15-10.

Distance – 25 laps

 

 

 

Winfield Daily Courier

Friday, July 29, 1927, Page 8:


AUTO POLO AND PUSH BALL TO FILL IN GAPS HERE IN THE AUTO RACES ON SATURDAY

So that there will be no waits between races, the officials of the auto races Saturday have arranged a number of added free acts which will not be seen during the first four days (of horse racing).

Those added attractions include the auto polo and auto push ball.  Auto polo has been seen by a number of local fans but auto push ball is a new feature and is played with a large ball standing six feet high and inflated with air.  This ball, which is made in England, cost $550 and is strong enough to balance a ton on top of it.  Other attractions will be a pie eating and milk drinking race in Ford cars between colored drivers and a boy’s push ball game.

In the pie eating race, the Negroes will race once around the half-mile and stop on the tape and eat a full sized pie.  On the next lap, they will stop and drink a quart bottle of milk and on the third lap, the first car in is the winner.

Winfield is fortunate in securing the auto race attractions as there are but five auto race events scheduled for Kansas this season and about the same number for Oklahoma.  The races are being conducted and staged by Don C. Onley of San Antonio in conjunction with the local Winfield Driving Association.

 

 

The above ad was published on page 2 of the Thursday, July 28, 1927 issue and on page 12 of the Friday, July 29, 1927 issue of the Arkansas City Daily Traveler.  Click your mouse on the ad above to see another picture of Charles Lebsack driving the Kerbs' Frontenac which was published on page 10 of the Friday, July 29, 1927 issue of the Arkansas City Daily Traveler.

 

 

 

Winfield Daily Courier
Monday, August 1, 1927, Page 8:

ACCIDENT MARS WINFIELD RACES
Cars Pile up and Two Drivers Are Hurt; Cars Burned

Narrowly escaping death when the racing cars which they were driving piled up on the racetrack south of the grandstand.  Charles Lebsack of Wichita, and Harley Wells of Miami, Oklahoma, were taken to William Newton Memorial hospital late Saturday evening.  With the exception of minor bruises, neither driver was hurt.

It was on the ninth lap of the last racing event of the day, the Kansas Grand Sweepstakes race in which five cars were entered, Lebsack, who had been leading the race from the first lap in his Frontenac, and Wells, who had maintained second position from the third lap, came under the wire at a speed of nearly 50 miles an hour.

On the curve south of the grandstand, a Chevrolet Special owned by Ralph Moody of Arkansas City and driven by George Roberts, had stalled close to the inside fence.  Lebsack crashed into the Chevrolet and Wells struck them both.

Both the Chevrolet and the Frontenac driven by Lebsack, burst into flames as they turned over.  Wells’ car remained upright and was several feet away from the other cars when they caught on fire.  The driver of the Chevrolet (Roberts) was not hurt.  Both the cars that burst into flames were badly damaged.


Fast Time Made

In spite of the muddy track which prevented the races from being started until 5 o’clock, the events were well run and fast speed was maintained.

 

Novelty Race - Pie Eating Contest - 3 laps (1 ½ miles) 6 Model-T Fords - Finishing order:

1.

Harry Nichols

 

 

 

 

2.

Caldin Fowler

 

 

 

 

3.

Francisco Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Event - Class A Race - 10 laps (5 miles) - 6 cars started - Time: 6:03.4 - Finishing order:

1.

Charles Lebsack

Wichita, Kansas

K-1

Frontenac

Running

2.

Harley Wells

Miami, Oklahoma

27

Frontenac

Running

3.

F. C. “George” Roberts

Arkansas City, Kansas

66

Chevrolet Special

Running

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Event - Class B Race - 10 laps (5 miles) - Time: 6:05.8 - Finishing order:

1.

Earl Hovenden 8

Arkansas City, Kansas

2

Chevrolet Special

Running

2.

Fred Lentz 9

Hutchinson, Kansas

5

Dodge Special

Running

3.

F. C. “George” Roberts

Arkansas City, Kansas

66

Chevrolet Special

Running

4.

Roy Rinehart 3

Arkansas City, Kansas

33

Laurel Special

DNF – Broken Driveshaft

          Fred Lentz led this race until the last lap when trouble dropped him back into second place right at the finish line.  Roy Rinehart was running third when a broken driveshaft caused him to drop out on the eighth lap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third Event - Class C Race - 15 laps (7 ½ miles) - 3 cars started - Time: 7:12.4 - Finishing order:

1.

Ralph Palmer

San Antonio, Texas

300

Sunbeam Special

Running

2.

Fred Lentz

Hutchinson, Kansas

5

Dodge Special

Running

3.

F. C. “George” Roberts

Arkansas City, Kansas

66

Chevrolet Special

DNF

          Fred Lentz's bad luck continued as he also led this race until the last lap when a broken transmission allowed Palmer to slip past for the win.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth Event - Three Cornered Match Race - 6 laps (3 miles) - 3 fastest cars from time trials - Time: 3:53.6 - Finishing order:

1.

Harley Wells

Miami, Oklahoma

27

Frontenac

Running

2.

Charles Lebsack

Wichita, Kansas

K-1

Frontenac

Running

3.

Earl Hovenden

Arkansas City, Kansas

2

Chevrolet Special

Running

         Harley Wells took the lead on the start and was never passed.  Lebsack and Hovenden exchanged positions several times with Lebsack making his final pass just before the finish line.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fifth Event – Australian Pursuit Straw Hat Derby - Canceled due to the lateness of the hour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sixth Event - 25 laps (12 ½ miles) scheduled but shortened to 8 laps (4 miles) after an accident on lap 9 - 5 cars started - Finishing order:

1.

Earl Hovenden 8

Arkansas City, Kansas

2

Chevrolet Special

Running

2.

Andrew Fuller 2

Arkansas City, Kansas

4

Chevrolet Special

Running

3.

Charles Lebsack

Wichita, Kansas

K-1

Frontenac

DNF – wreck

4.

Harley Wells

Miami, Oklahoma

27

Frontenac

DNF – wreck

5.

F. C. “George” Roberts

Arkansas City, Kansas

66

Chevrolet Special

DNF – wreck

          George Roberts had only completed four laps before his engine expired.  The race became a three car battle after that as Joe Hutchinson's #44 Chevrolet Special (driven by Andrew Fuller) was down on power and he was unable to keep up.  Roberts' car was still sitting on the racetrack when leader Lebsack and second place Wells crashed into it in the first turn of lap nine.

 

 

 

Arkansas City Daily Traveler
Monday, August 1, 1927 - Front Page:

Races Here Grab Prizes
Local Drivers Make A "Cleaning" At the Winfield Races

Two firsts, a second, and three thirds were the places won by local automobile racers at the auto races held in Winfield Saturday afternoon.  The local boys won $280.50 of the $500 offered to racers.

Earl Hovenden, driving a Chevrolet special owned by Dwight Moody, won first in the Class B race making the five miles in six minutes, five and four-fifths seconds.  He also took first in the sweepstakes race.  Andrew Fuller, driving Joe Hutchinson’s Chevrolet, took a second place in the sweepstakes race.

F. C. Roberts, piloting Ralph Moody’s Chevrolet, grabbed a third place in the Class A five mile race and a third in the Class B five mile race.  Hovenden got third in the race of the three fastest cars entered.


Lebsack in Good Form

Charles Lebsack, Wichita, showed good form with his Frontenac special when he won first in the Class A, second in the special race of the three fastest cars, and was leading on the sweepstakes race when his car, with two others, was wrecked on the south curve of the track.

Harley Wells, Miami, in a Frontenac, was also showing plenty of speed in the races and thrilled the fans with his daring work on the curves.

Roy Rinehart, local driver of Roy Hume’s Laurel special, was giving a close race to Earl Hovenden in the Class B but went out on the eighth lap of the ten lap race with a broken drive shaft.

 

Some Thrillers

The Class B race was one of the best with three cars racing close together for second place.  The special race between the three fastest cars entered furnished many thrills to the crowd.  First one and then the other led and not once was any car sure of first place until the last half of the last lap.  Hovenden and Lebsack led a close race throughout and Wells, of Miami, came in frequently to give both a scare.  Wells made a spectacular finish when he sped around the curve on the home stretch to win the race.

Lebsack was close behind and Hovenden was racing a close third.  An average of 52 miles an hour was made by the racers.

Andrew Fuller

The track was in bad condition and the races did not start until 5 o’clock although scheduled to begin at 2 p.m.  Prior to the races, a pie eating contest was held with six Negro boys, driving auto polo Fords, entered.  The object was to go one lap, stop and eat a pie, then go the second lap and stop to drink a quart of milk, and the driver who came in on the third lap would be declared the winner.  The race furnished much excitement.

Push ball contest was also held before the races started.  One of the largest crowds gathered during the week witnessed the auto races, the last event of a week’s races.

Sweepstakes:  Earl Hovenden, Arkansas City, first; Andrew Fuller, Arkansas City, second.  The accident in the sweepstakes race which put Lebsack, Wells, and Roberts out of the race marred the races.  It occurred the last thing of the day.

 

 

 

Arkansas City Daily Traveler
Monday, August 1, 1927 - Front Page:

Race Drivers in Close Call
Three Cars Pile Up On Winfield Track; Men Escape

Three auto racers, one an Arkansas City man, narrowly escaped death Saturday in the last auto race at Winfield, when three cars were wrecked on the south corner of the track.  Charles Lebsack, Wichita, and Harley Wells, Miami, Okla., were slightly bruised and cut, but F. C. Roberts, Arkansas City, who was on the bottom, was not scratched.

The accident occurred in the ninth lap of the 15-lap sweepstake race when Roberts, driver of Ralph Moody’s car, who had gone out in the second (lap) because of engine trouble, started in again and had just rounded the curve when Lebsack, leading the race, came upon him and, unable to go around because of the mud, climbed upon Robert’s car.  At this instant, when the car was in mid-air, the second man in the race, Harley Wells, unable to slow down, struck both cars and all turned over.

Moody’s car was burned considerable and Lebsack’s car was partially burned.  Lebsack and Wells were both rushed to the hospital and the fire department was called to extinguish the fire on Moody’s car.

 

 

http://winfield.50megs.com/Mays/CharlesLebsack.jpg

Charles Lebsack in Leonard E. Kerbs' Frontenac

This yellow Frontenac with black lettering is the car that Charles "Butch" Lebsack (1895-1967) drove in this race at Winfield.  It was owned by his cousin, Leonard E. Kerbs (1895-1960) of Otis, Kansas and Lebsack is not known to have ever driven for any other car owner.

Frontenacs were built primarily from modified Ford parts by Arthur and Louis Chevrolet.  Parts, or complete race cars, could be purchased from the Chevrolet Brother's Frontenac Motor Company by anyone with the money to go racing.  A complete, new Frontenac cost around $2,700 in the 1920s.

Click your mouse on the photograph above to see other photographs of the Kerbs' racing team - Photo from the Betty Able collection

 

 

 

Andrew Fuller in his Race Car

This is a rather poor picture of Andrew B. "Cokey" Fuller and his race car copied from the Arkansas City Daily Traveler.  Click your mouse on the photo above to see a better one of Fuller in a Gallivan Ford

 

 

George Dwight Moody

1 Ralph E. Moody (1898-1979) co-owned the Moody Machine Shop in Arkansas City, Kansas, with his brother, George Dwight Moody (1895-1965).  Ralph never married and, after his death, the machine shop was torn down revealing a large stash of cash that had been hidden in the walls of the building.  Ralph and Dwight are buried just a few feet from each other in Riverview Cemetery, Arkansas City, Kansas.


2 Andrew B. "Cokey" Fuller (1902-1932) died in Denver, Colorado and is interred in the Riverview Mausoleum in Riverview Cemetery, Arkansas City, Kansas.  He got his nickname due to his fondness for whisky mixed with Coca-Cola.


3 Raymond Roy Rinehart, born in 1885 at Arkansas City, Kansas, was one of the few men to race both motorcycles and cars on the half-mile racetrack at Winfield.  He moved to Blackwell, Oklahoma in 1933 and passed away there in 1968.  Roy is interred in the Riverview Mausoleum in Riverview Cemetery on the northwest edge of Arkansas City.

 

4 Roy D. Hume (1889-1947), was a lifelong resident of Arkansas City, Kansas and his body is interred in the Community Mausoleum in Riverview Cemetery at Arkansas City.


5 Joe Hutchinson (1894-1958) was the fire chief and director of Civil Defense for the city of Arkansas City, Kansas.  He is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Arkansas City.


6 Forest Shipman "Blackie" O'Bannon (1903-1929) died of typhoid fever and is buried in Riverview Cemetery, Arkansas City, Kansas.


7 This is probably an error in the newspaper story and was almost certainly Claude Donica, rather than a Bob Donica.

 

8 Earl Lonzo Hovenden (1903-1966) is buried in Sunset Memorial Park at Albuquerque, New Mexico.

 

9 Fred Sherman Lentz (1885-1952) died at Great Bend, Kansas.

 

 

 

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