Glenn Mark Breed

1880 – 1960

A True Pioneer in the Sport of Automobile Racing

 

The rather poor quality picture at left of Glenn Breed in a Hudson “Super-Six” special appeared on a handbill announcing a series of 10-lap match races between Fred Horey and Breed that were to be run at the Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson, Kansas on September 21 and 22, 1917.  Click your mouse on the picture to see the complete handbill – handbill from the Christine Logan collection

 

The picture at right of Glenn Breed in his black and white #1 Hudson Super-Six special appeared in a number of ads run in Hutchinson, Kansas newspapers in September of 1917 announcing a series of 10-lap match races between Fred Horey and Breed that were to be run at the Kansas State Fair in Hutchinson on September 21 and 22, 1917.  Click your mouse on the picture to see a little larger version of it - Hutchinson Gazette and Hutchinson News from September of 1917

 

 

 

Glenn Mark Breed was born on May 4, 1880 near Breedsville in Van Buren County, Michigan.  He was the younger of two sons born to Silas A. Breed (1848-1922) and Emily L. (Stoughton) Breed (1851-1919).  Breedsville was named in honor of Glenn’s paternal grandfather, Silas A. Breed (1800-1878) who had settled there in 1835.

Racing became an interest of Breed's early in life and he competed in a number of bicycle races in southern Michigan in the late 1890s.

After a quarrel with his father, Glenn left home at the age of 18 and moved to Jackson, Michigan where he went to work with Bob Burman as a “mechanican” and “tester” for Billy Durant's Jackson Automobile Company.  That company created Buick and both Breed and Burman became members of the Buick factory auto racing team.

 Webmaster's Note:  Early Breed family records state that Glenn's full name was "Glen Milton Breed" and that he was born on May 4, 1881 but Glenn himself stated on his draft registration in 1918 that he was 38 years old, was born on May 4, 1880, and that his full name was Glenn Mark Breed indicating that he may have changed his middle name after he left home.)

Glenn Breed's signature as he signed it on his  draft registration card for the military in 1918.

 

 

 

August 7, 1905

1-mile dirt oval - Detroit Driving Park at Grosse Pointe, Michigan

            Breed drove a Buick.

Breed finished in second place just ½ car length behind E. F. Schoeffler who was driving a Jackson automobile.  The event was a five-mile race for stock, stripped touring cars valued at less than $1.500.  One newspaper reporter described the contest between Breed and Schoeffler as a “pretty race”.

 

August 8, 1905

1-mile dirt oval – Detroit Driving Park at Grosse Pointe, Michigan

Breed drove a Buick.

These were non-championship races but sanctioned by the American Automobile Association (A.A.A.)

Breed won a five-mile race for stock, stripped touring cars valued at less than $1,500.  His winning time was 8 minutes, 11.4 seconds for an average speed of 36.63 M.P.H.

One of the five-mile races in the open class at Grosse Pointe that day is still talked about today.  Barney Oldfield barely escaped with his life when he crashed his famous Peerless Green Dragon after tangling with a Reo driven by Dan Wurgis.  Webb Jay went on to win the race in his famous White steamer Whistling Billy.

Oldfield had won his first race on the one-mile dirt oval Grosse Pointe racetrack in 1902 and was the defending 1904 World Track Champion.  Following the crash on this day, Oldfield is said to have cursed his car’s color.  Some believe that incident gave rise to the long held superstition that green racing cars were bad luck.

Breed did not compete in the open class that day and was not entered in the particular race in which this accident occurred.

 

May 24, 1906

1-mile hill climb – Dead Horse Hill at Worchester, Massachusetts

            Breed drove a Buffum Model 24 Runabout.

Breed finished fourth in 2 minutes 50.2 seconds and behind L. Markle, George Kimball, and a Mr. Burrage.  He was 53.2 seconds behind winner Markle.

 

The Buick Testers’ Association was organized on June 4, 1906 in Jackson, Michigan primarily as a benevolent organization whose purpose was to “pay damages in case of collisions” to drivers employed by the company.  Glenn Breed was elected by his peers to be the first vice-president of that organization.

 

June 27, 1908

½ mile hill climb – Dodson Hill at Kansas City, Missouri

            Breed drove a Buick.

Breed finished fourth in 2 minutes 46.0 seconds and behind George Gibson, E. L. Weiser, and William Hiatt.  He was 1 minute 16 seconds behind winner Gibson.  The class was for Runabout automobiles valued at between $851 and $1250.  Breed then finished eighth in 1 minute 30.4 seconds in the “Free-for-All” race behind A. O. Brooks, Don Cole, R. C. Greenlease, L. Scott, E. L. Weiser, William Hiatt, and Charles Lavendoski.  He was 30.8 seconds behind winner Brooks.  The term “Free-for-All” refers to feature races for all entries regardless of class.

 

July 4, 1908

1-mile dirt oval Elm Ridge Racetrack in Kansas City, Missouri

Breed drove a Buick.

Breed won a three-mile race for Runabouts valued under $1,201 in a time of 4 minutes 10 seconds.

 

July 31, 1909

1-mile dirt oval Elm Ridge Racetrack in Kansas City, Missouri

As a member of the Buick racing team, Breed had at least four different cars at his disposal and both he and Bob Burman drove a different Buick in each of the four races they competed in this day.

Breed finished second to Burman in a five-mile race for gasoline powered stock cars valued at $1,000 or less.  Breed completed the five laps in 5 minutes, 36 seconds in the #22 Buick which was 20 seconds slower than Burman’s time.

Breed finished second to Burman in a 10-mile race for gasoline powered stock cars valued at between $1,001 and $2,000.  Breed finished the 10 laps in 10 minutes, 24 seconds which was 21.6 seconds slower than Burman’s time.  Breed’s mount was the #29 Buick.  Third place finisher A. O. Brooks of the Stoddard-Dayton factory racing team filed a formal protest saying the Buicks driven by Breed and Burman were not stock.  The protest was apparently denied as the finishing order was allowed to stand.

Breed finished second to Burman in a 10-mile race for either gasoline, or steam powered cars, that was sponsored by the Kansas City Board of Trade.  Breed’s time in the #37 Buick was 10 minutes, 18 seconds which was 5 seconds slower than Burman’s time.

Breed finished second to Burman in a 100-mile open race for gasoline powered stock cars completing the distance in 2 hours, 2 minutes, and 48 seconds which was 8 minutes and 40 seconds slower than Burman’s time.  Breed drove the #4 Buick in this event.

 

October 19, 1909

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove a Buick Model 17.

Breed won the 10-mile “Free-for-All” race in 14 minutes, 31.0 seconds.

 

Apparently Breed left the Buick factory racing team in August, or September, of 1909 and moved first to St. Louis, Missouri before migrating on Kansas City and then to Hutchinson, Kansas.

On the night of March 2, 1910, Mrs. D. D. Anderson hired an automobile and chauffeur from the Woods Garage in Hutchinson to transport herself and her 17-year-old daughter to a nearby town for a family emergency.  Given the urgency of the situation, Glenn Breed, then employed as a “mechanican” at Woods Garage, was selected to do the driving.  The three had not traveled far from Hutchinson when the car struck a rut in the road at a high rate of speed and veered sharply throwing both ladies onto the road seriously injuring them.

Breed was married on July 12, 1910 at Hutchinson, Kansas to Martha Elizabeth “Mattie” (Sparr) Krukal.  Mattie was already the mother of a young son, Albert E. Sparr, who had been born on March 29, 1909 at Wichita, Kansas.

On October 1, 1910, Breed accepted a position as “mechanican” for the Bushton Auto Company in Bushton, Kansas and moved there with his family.

 

October 12, 1910

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

            Breed drove both a Buick Model 10 that was owned by L. E. Hall and a Buick Model 16.

Breed won a match race between his Buick Model 16 and an Auburn 40 driven by Carl E. Evans of Wichita, Kansas.  He then switched to Hall’s Buick Model 10 and won a 10-lap race for stock automobiles valued up to $1,000.  Next, Breed finished fourth behind C. W. “Will” Swain, George C. Wiles, and William A. “Will” Burke in a 20-lap race for stock automobiles valued up to $1,500.  Finally, Breed won the 20-lap Free-for-All in his Buick Model 16.

 

Glenn Breed in his 1909 Buick Model 17 at

Winfield, Kansas on July 3, 1913.

Photo from the private collection of Michael A. Darrah.

Please do not reproduce this photo without his permission

 

In 1911, Breed purchased a fire damaged 30 H.P. (one source says 38 H.P.) 1909 Buick Model 17 from Arthur W. Eagan after Eagan’s automobile agency in Hutchinson, Kansas burned.  Breed then rebuilt the car and was soon racing it on dirt tracks around Kansas.  With Breed’s connections to the Buick factory racing team, he may have rebuilt this car as what later became known as a “Marquette Buick” which had been developed by the Buick factory racing team between 1909 and 1911 as a stock appearing Buick but was in reality a hybrid state-of-the-art racing car.

 

July 4, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed finished second in the main event during a blinding sand storm.  Given the conditions, he said that he was pleased with that outcome.

 

September 6, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Clay County Fairgrounds in Clay Center, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

No results of these races have been located to date.

 

September 8, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – McPherson County Fairgrounds in McPherson, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed started on the inside rail position in a four abreast start in a five-mile race and led the other three entries all the way winning by 5 rods (82½ feet) to collect $100 from the purse.  His closest competitor, Nels Blondefield, crashed his John-Pool-owned Regal through the fence in this event and was unable to make repairs in time to start the next race.  Breed then finished ahead of two other entries to win the ten-mile race in 12 minutes, 19 seconds thus collecting another $125 from the purse.

 

September 20, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed led all the way and finished first in the Free-for-All race to win $200.  The only other entrant was driving a Jackson automobile and dropped out midway through the event.

 

October 1, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed won the first of three five-mile races with ease lapping some of the other competitors three times.  His closest competitor in practice had been a Crawford owned by the Baldauf & Liggett automobile agency in Wichita, Kansas but it broke down on the starting line in the first race and did not compete in either of the remaining two races.  To help spread the prize money around, the rules stated that the winner of each race would be excluded from competing in any further racing that day.

 

October, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed finished first in the best of two-out-of-three five-mile heat races and collected 60% of the gate receipts in purse.  The remaining gate receipts were paid to the driver of a full bodied Buick that finished in second place in both heat races.

 

October 7, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Ottawa County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Minneapolis, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

The car’s crankcase broke while Breed was warming the car up and he was unable to compete in any of the races.

  

Glenn Breed in his 1909 Buick Model 17 leading

W. W. “Cockeyed” Brown in the first heat race at

Winfield, Kansas on July 4, 1913.

Cowley County (Kansas) Historical Society

 

November 11, 1911

½ mile dirt oval – Pratt County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Pratt, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

700 people saw these races sponsored by the Wichita Motor Club.  Breed won the first race, a 5-mile event in 7 minutes, 12 seconds.

Arthur Peterson won the second 5-mile race driving a Crawford.  He was followed across the finish line by Breed in second place.

The fourth race was a 5-mile race won by Breed in 6 minutes, 59¼ seconds.

These races had been run from a standing start.  In the fifth event however, Breed ran two laps in 1 minute, 17 seconds to set the standard for the track record for 1 mile as no one had run that distance on this racetrack with a flying start before.

 

In April of 1912, Breed moved his family to Garden City, Kansas but they stayed there only a short time before moving again; this time to Winfield, Kansas where he got a job as an auto “mechanican”.

 

July 4, 1912

½ mile dirt oval - Cowley County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Winfield, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed finished second in a 4-lap heat race to fellow Buick driver W. W. Brown and then won the 20-lap feature race over Brown in a new track record time of either 12 minutes, 8 seconds or 14 minutes, 8 seconds depending on which source is to be believed.

 

September 4, 1912

Newkirk, Oklahoma

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17 (although one newspaper account said he drove a Buick Model 16.)

All that is currently known about these races is that Breed did not win.

 

September 6, 1912

½ mile dirt oval – McPherson County Fairgrounds in McPherson, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17 (although one newspaper account said he drove a Buick Model 30.)

15,000 people watched Breed win both races that were run.  One was a five-mile race and the other was a ten-mile race.  The other two cars in these contests were a Stearns 60 and a Warren-Detroit 40 but the driver’s names were not given.

 

September 17, 1912

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed won the Free-for-All race.

 

September 18, 1912

½ mile dirt oval – Ottawa County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Minneapolis, Kansas

            Breed entered his 1909 Buick Model 17.

No results of these races have been located.

 

September 21, 1912

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

            Breed entered his 1909 Buick Model 17.

                        Breed’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.  W. W. Brown of Kansas City, Missouri won the 6-lap race for stock cars in his Buick Model 10.

 

November 11, 1912

Wichita, Kansas

          Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17

                        No results of these races have been located.

 

July 4, 1913

½ mile dirt oval - Cowley County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Winfield, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed had moved his family to Emporia, Kansas since the last race at Winfield but returned with his Buick on this date to win three 6-lap heat races.

 

September 12, 1913

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Belleville, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed had moved his family to Iola, Kansas before he competed in this event.  This “Free-for-All” race consisted of three 10-lap segments each starting all nine cars that were entered.  The over-all winner was determined by adding together each competitor’s best two finishes in those three races.  Breed was declared that over-all winner.  The best time for ten laps was 6 minutes, 11 seconds and the best time for two consecutive laps was 1 minute, 11 seconds.

 

September 23, 1913

½ mile dirt oval – Ottawa County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Minneapolis, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed finished first in the auto race.

 

October 10, 1913

½ mile dirt oval – City Park Racetrack in Chanute, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17 (although one newspaper account claims that it was a Buick Model 16)

Between 8,000 and 10,000 fans saw Breed leading the second heat race on this afternoon when a wheel collapsed on the Buick Bear Cat being driven in second place by W. W. Brown of Kansas City, Missouri.  The racetrack was so dusty that Charles Shaffstall of Coffeyville, Kansas, who was following behind Brown in a cloud of dust, did not see Brown’s stopped vehicle and ran into it turning his John-Jersezy-owned 1910 Flanders 20 over onto its side.  Shaffstall was seriously injured when he was thrown from the Flanders 20 and completely over Brown’s disabled “Bear Cat” Buick.

Brown was able to borrow a wheel from a spectator and was ready when the second heat race was restarted.  This time, Breed’s Buick left the racetrack in the same sport that Brown and Staffshall had collided.  Breed’s car climbed an embankment, lost a wheel, and almost turned over.

Breed won first place in the “Free-for-All” race.

 

            Breed spent the winter of 1913 and the first 4 months of 1914 working for the White Auto Repair Co. in Indianapolis, Indiana.  While he was in Indiana, he put his Buick racing car in storage in Chanute, Kansas in the care of J. F. Jersezy.

 

July 4, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Belleville, Kansas

Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

            Breed ran 10-laps in 5 minutes, 35.8 seconds to defeat Louis Disproof for the second time in a test two-out-of-three match race by 1 minute, 15.2 seconds.

 

August 19, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – City Park Racetrack in Chanute, Kansas

Breed entered his 1909 Buick Model 17.

The races were postponed until August 26, 1914 due to rain.

  

August 21, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – Marion County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Knoxville, Iowa

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed finished in fifth place behind T. W. Robinson driving a Chandler, W. H. Fleming driving a Chevrolet, Frank Hart driving a Buick, and Albert Sullivan driving an Overland in a five-mile race for stock touring cars.

 

August 26, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – City Park Racetrack in Chanute, Kansas

Breed entered his 1909 Buick Model 17.

4,000 racing fans watched Breed won the first 5-mile heat race in 7 minutes, 6.0 seconds.  Breed finished second in the second 5-lap heat race, one car-length behind W. W. Brown from Kansas City, Missouri who was driving the “Bear Cat II” Buick Model 22 owned by John F. Jersezy of Chanute.  W. W. Brown also won the third 5-mile heat race after Breed dropped out with engine trouble.

 

 August 28, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Belleville, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed had moved his family to Chanute, Kansas before he competed in this event.  Seven cars were entered in the “Free-for-All” that was run in three 10-lap segments.  Breed’s name does not appear among the top three over-all finishers who were the only ones to get their names published in the Belleville Telescope and Freeman.  Albert “Dutch” Striegel of Kansas City driving his Stafford was the over-all winner completing the final 10-lap segment in 6 minutes, 39.5 seconds.  B. T. Barber of Iola, Kansas finished second in his Ford, and A. T. Jones of Kansas City finished third in his Regal.

 

September 1, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed won the “Free-for-All” race in 6 minutes, 27 seconds in a field of seven cars.

 

September 26, 1914

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

1,500 spectators saw Breed finish second twice to Paul Gee of Kansas City, Missouri who was piloting a Stafford.  Gee was the victor in both of the 5-mile heat races that made up the “Free-for-All” event on this day.  The total purse was $300.

 

October 1, 1914

1-mile dirt oval - Johnson County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Iowa City, Iowa

Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed survived a collision with J. Sam Wilson of Iowa City, Iowa on the third lap of the 30-mile feature race that damaged his steering and caused his car to behave erratically for the remainder of the event but he managed to finish in fourth place behind Gus Monckmeier driving a Staver owned by F. H. Phelps; “Speedy” Walters driving a Buick owned by C. R. Parker; and “Bud” Jones driving a Mercer owned by F. W. Lewis.

 

May 5, 1915

½ dirt oval – Forest Park Racetrack in Coffeyville, Kansas

Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

There were said to have been 3,000 fans in the grandstands and the winning car was driven by H. Roy Gillette of Fredonia, Kansas but the results of these races have yet to be located.

  

May 13, 1915

½ dirt oval - Cowley County Fairgrounds Racetrack  in Winfield, Kansas

            Breed entered his 1909 Buick Model 17 in this race but engine trouble kept him from competing.

 

July 30, 1915

½ dirt oval – Labette County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Oswego, Kansas

            Breed drove a Studebaker owned by John F. Jersezy of Chanute, Kansas

Breed finished in second place behind H. Roy Gillette of Fredonia, Kansas in these races.  The car Breed drove was ill-handling and he “had difficulty in keeping inside the fences.  Once, he let it out on the straightaway and the car swung completely about and started back in the opposite direction.”

 

August 20, 1915

1-mile dirt oval - Johnson County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Iowa City, Iowa

Breed’s “professional racing car” was shipped Express via rail from Chanute, Kansas on August 17th but it arrived in at Iowa City 5 hours too late for him to compete in these races.

 

Glenn Breed in his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”

Don Radbruch collection

 

 

October 2, 1915

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1909 Buick Model 17.

Breed won the two preliminary races and the five-mile feature race in 6 minutes, 17.25 seconds to collect the largest share of the $250 total purse.  Estimates of the size of the crowd varied widely with some accounts saying there were as few as 1,500 spectators while other newspaper accounts list the number as being six-thousand.

 

October 14, 1915

1½ -mile dirt oval – Wichita Speedway in Wichita, Kansas

Three entrants including Breed failed to start this scheduled eight car race.  No reason was given.

 

August 11, 1916

1-mile dirt oval - Johnson County Fairgrounds Racetrack in Iowa City, Iowa

Breed entered a Stutz in this race.

Breed did not finish among the top three in this race as those are the only ones mentioned in the account of this event the Iowa City Citizen.  C. R. Parker won the 30-mile feature race driving a Duesenberg and followed by J. A. Thompson and Floyd Willard both driving Fords.  8 cars started that feature race.

 

August 22, 1916

½ mile dirt oval – North Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack in Belleville, Kansas

            Breed drove his brand new 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Breed was clearly the class of the field in these races.  The “Free-for-All” was to consist of three 10-lap segments each starting all cars entered.  Each competitor’s best two finishing positions were used to determine the over-all winner.  Breed easily out distanced the field in each of the first two segments winning them handily.  With an insurmountable lead, he chose to sit out the final segment (which was shortened to six laps) and was still declared the over-all champion.  The first two finishers in the overall championship received a total of $350 between them from the purse.  The results from the second preliminary 6-lap heat race that day have yet to be located but it is believed that Breed won that race as well.

 

August 29, 1916

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

10,000 people saw Breed finish first in each of the five-mile heats that made up the “Free-for-All” event.  His time for the first five-mile heat was 7 minutes, 26 seconds and he collected a total of $300 from the purse.

 

Summer, 1916

½ mile dirt oval - Nemaha County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Seneca, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Breed set the fastest time in time trials at 1 minute, 4.6 seconds for two laps.

 

September 23, 1916

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fair Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six”.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A).  Breed possessed a valid I.M.C.A. license allowing him to compete.

           Breed had moved his family to Salina, Kansas before he competed in this event.  He won a 10-lap match race over Eddie Hearne pulling away a little more each lap to win by at least 150 yards and covered the five miles in a time of 5 minutes, 50 seconds.  Hearn was driving a Briscoe and offered no excuses.  He was quoted after the race as saying that Breed was just the better driver.  Hearn had started on the pole position and had been allowed to set the starting pace.  Breed disclosed that his Hudson’s wheel base had been shortened to 100 inches and that the six-cylinder Hudson engine was equipped with an oversized carburetor and manifolds.  He also said the engine had a 3½ inch bore, 5 inch stroke, a 288 CID, and used caster oil as a lubricant.  His employer, a Salina Hudson dealer, presented him with “in the neighborhood of $300” for winning and a Hutchinson Hudson dealer, A. A. Kirk, immediately added $100 to that.  Fair management attributed the largest Saturday crowd to ever be seen on the fairgrounds to this race.

 

This publicity photo of Glenn Breed and riding “mechanican” Nels Blondefield seated in Breed’s black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special appeared in the September 15, 1917 issue of “The Hudson Triangle” newsletter.  Breed usually drove alone and the only “mechanican” known to have ever ridden with him in his Hudson was Blondefield who worked for Breed in 1916 and also listed Breed as being his employer on official documents in 1917 and 1918.

 

 

September 29 – 30, 1916

1-mile dirt oval – Lubbock, Texas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Breed won the feature race on Friday and then came back to finish first in the 100-mile feature race on Saturday.

  

October 7, 1916

2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

            Will S. Thompson of Hutchinson, Kansas was the overall winner of these races but no further record of these races has been located.

 

October, 1916

½ mile dirt oval – Woodward County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Woodward, Oklahoma

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Breed won first place in the “Free-for-All” events on three consecutive days.

 

November 3, 1916

Meridian Road Cup Record Run Across Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” with riding “mechanican” Nels Blondefield.

He was given a trophy for this event which a grandson still has to this day.  He completed his 277 mile leg in 5 ¾ hours.

 

Glenn Breed was licensed to race with the International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A.) in 1917 and possibly in other years as well, but it is unclear how many of the races that he competed in were actually sanctioned by that organization.

 

May, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Texarkana Fairgrounds Racetrack at Texarkana, Arkansas

Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won two 45-mile “Free-for-Alls”.  His fastest time in the two races was 37 minutes, 7 seconds.  The text of Breed’s telegram to Hudson headquarters reporting the victories as being at “Texico” appears in the June 2, 1917 issue of The Hudson Triangle newsletter.  It is obvious that Hudson officials did not understand the location of the victories as they immediately issued a news release that was picked up by the Oakland Tribune and the Nevada State Journal saying that Breed had won the races before more than 50,000 fans in Mexico City!  A correction was printed in the June 9, 1917 issue of The Hudson Triangle newsletter.

 

July 4, 1917

5/8-mile dirt oval – Amarillo Fairgrounds Racetrack in Amarillo, Texas

Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            No record has been found as to how he did in those races.

 

July 28, 1917

2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the “Free-for-All” race.

 

August 22, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Central Kansas Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed and Harold Roller were fighting for the lead when “one machine hooked the rear of the other”.  Both cars crashed through a board fence with Breed’s Hudson breaking off an 8-inch pole.  Breed’s gas tank exploded in the melee but, miraculously, neither driver was injured.

 

 

This photo of Glenn Breed (center) with his black and white 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special #1 was taken on November 7, 1917 at the West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

 

September 3, 1917

2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the feature race here by a margin of 15 miles over the second place finisher!  According to articles in the Boston Daily Globe and the Reno Nevada State Journal published in September of 1917, the triumph at Dodge City was the 26th victory in 27 starts for Breed in just the past two years.  A search of the Dodge City newspaper however failed to turn up mention of this event and the San Antonio Light states that this race took place at “Dodge City, Iowa” instead.

 

September 21, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fair Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A)

            Breed won a match race over Fred Horey driving a new short wheelbase four-cylinder Fiat racer before a crowd estimated at 25,000 people and set a new 10-lap track record of 5 minutes, 33.2 seconds in the process.  At no time during the race was there more than one car length between the two automobiles.

 

September 22, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fair Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A)

            Breed was defeated in two straight 10-lap match races by Fred Horey who was driving a four-cylinder Fiat racer.  Horey had won a coin toss and started the first match race of the day from the pole position.  Breed jumped out in front at the start and lead for two laps before Horey passed him and went on to win in a time of 5 minutes, 34.2 seconds.  Horey led the second race from start to finish covering the distance in a time of 5 minutes, 31.2 seconds and was declared the winner of the best two-out-of-three, two-day match race.  Breed would ignore the plaudits of the crowd.  He was a quiet, retiring man who seldom said a word but he did pull along side Horey’s racer and offer his congratulations saying he had just been beat by a faster car.   He did not offer any excuses.

 

October 2, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Cloud County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Concordia, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

No record has been found as to how he did in those races.

 

October 8, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed ran 10-laps in 5 minutes, 42.2 seconds to defeat Louis Disbrow in the first of a best two-out-of-three 10-lap match races by 12.8 seconds.

 

October 10, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed ran 10-laps in 5 minutes, 32.8 seconds to lead all the way and defeat Louis Disbrow for the second time in a best two-out-of-three match race.  Disbrow was 18.2 seconds behind at the end.  Bread is said to have collected $1,000 for the feat.

 

 

This photo was taken of the start of a race at the Dickinson County Fairgrounds at Abilene, Kansas c1918.   The driver of the black and white 1916 Hudson "Super Six" special #1 at right is Glenn Breed.

Kansasmemory.org, Kansas State Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply

 

October 12, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed started a 2-lap time trial but spun out on the first lap and stopped on the racetrack in the south turn.  He was allowed to start his trial again and turned in a time of 1:07.8 for the two laps.

 

October 20, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln Fairgrounds Racetrack at Lincoln, Kansas

Breed drove black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Harold Roller of Lincoln, and Glenn Breed each posted $1,000 in cash with a local bank in case of forfeiture.  Breed won the best two out of three match races against Roller who was driving a 16-valve Ford.

 

October 27, 1917

1-mile dirt oval - Fair Park Racetrack at the Texas State Expo in Dallas, Texas

Breed drove black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed competed against the likes of Jules Ellingboe and Fred Horey whom he lost to on this day in a match race.

 

November 3, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – Forest Park Racetrack in Coffeyville, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the specialty race and was awarded the $1,000 posted purse.

 

November 7, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed set a new one-lap track record of 33.4 seconds in time trials breaking the previous record by .2 seconds that had been held by Jerry Wonderlich.  Breed then lead all the way in the first segment of the best two-out-of three segments match race against “Wild Bill” Endicott who was driving the Sweeney Special.  Breed finished just one foot ahead of Endicott in a time of 3 minutes, 45.4 seconds.  Breed also lead all the way in taking the second of the six-lap segments in 3 minutes, 42.0 seconds again beating Endicott to the finish line by mere inches and setting a new track record for that distance.  The crowd watching the races was described as being small.

 

Glenn Breed in his Hudson “Super-Six” special

Wichita Daily Eagle

November 5, 1917 – Page 8

 

 

November 8, 1917

½ mile dirt oval – West Side Racetrack in Wichita, Kansas

Breed drove his black and white #1 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed set the fastest one-lap time of the day in time trials at 33.8 seconds.  A scheduled match race between Breed and Ray Burr Lampkin was canceled when Lampkin’s Sun Ray Duesenberg was unable to report to the starting line due to a broken housing.  Breed then started last of the four entrants in the Australian Pursuit race and finished second to “Farmer” Paul Henderson who completed the seven laps in his Du Chesneau in 4 minutes, 27.0 seconds.

 

July 4, 1918

2-mile dirt oval – Dodge City Speedway northeast of Dodge City, Kansas

            Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed set the fastest time in time trials with a one-lap time of one minute, 24 seconds.  He then took first place in each of three 15-lap heat races.

 

September 20, 1918

½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fair Racetrack in Hutchinson, Kansas

Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A).

Breed won the first heat in a best two-out-of-three series of 10-lap match races between himself and Sig Haugdahl.  Haugdahl lost a cylinder in his engine and dropped out on the ninth lap of that first race.  Breed refused to allow Haugdahl to change cars for the remaining races so Haugdahl disconnected the damaged cylinder and easily won the second and third heats to be declared the over-all winner.

 

This very poor quality photo of Glenn Breed in his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special was taken in 1922.

San Antonio Express photo

 

 

April 5, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Garfield County Fairgrounds in Enid, Oklahoma

Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

Breed had moved his family to Fredonia, Kansas before he competed in this event.  He finished first in the 15-mile feature race against six other competitors in a time of 19 minutes, 24.2 seconds.  4,000 spectators attended this race.

 

April 6, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Garfield County Fairgrounds in Enid, Oklahoma

Breed drove his 1916 Hudson “Super-Six”.

No results of these races have been located to date.

 

July 4, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds Racetrack at North Platte, Nebraska

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

There was a $2,750 total purse posted for these races.  Breed ran second to King Rhiley for the first 18 laps of the 50-lap feature race.  At that point, Rhiley stopped with a flat tire and while a fresh tire and wheel were being put on Rhiley's car, Breed assumed to lead and then pulled out front by more than one lap.  Rhiley rejoined the fray and was gaining on Breed when Breed was forced out of the race with transmission trouble.  Rhiley completed the 50 laps in 32 minutes, 15 seconds before a crowd of more than 7,000 to take home $1.400 from the posted purse.

 

September 1, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds Racetrack at North Platte, Nebraska

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed’s one lap time of 34.8 seconds in time trials was the second quickest time of the day, 1.6 seconds slower than the lap turned in by King Rhiley.  Breed then finished second behind Noel Bullock in the Handicap race and second behind Rhiley in the 25-mile sweepstakes race.

 

September 3 – 4, 1919

1-mile dirt oval – Kenwood Park Speedway at Salina, Kansas

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the 20-lap race from a standing start in 12 minutes, 32.0 seconds.

 

September 11, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Carter County Fairgrounds Racetrack at Ardmore, Oklahoma

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed’s one lap time of 34.8 seconds in time trials was the second quickest time of the day, 1.6 seconds slower than the lap turned

 

September 27, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds Racetrack at North Platte, Nebraska

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed turned two laps of the half-mile track in 1:08.5 during time trials.  That was the second best time with King Rhiley being the only driver to go faster.  The handicap race was won by Noel Bullock who was given the longest head start.  Breed finished in second place in that race.  Breed took third place in the 50-lap sweepstakes race behind winner Rhiley and second place finisher Bullock.

 

October 14, 1919

½ mile dirt oval – Great Bend Fairgrounds Track at Great Bend, Kansas

Breed entered his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed and John Mais of Salina, Kansas leased the fairgrounds from the fair board for the day.  They posted $1,000 in prize money for the auto races and each also entered those races themselves.

 

May 15 – 16, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Colcord Track in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Breed entered his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

There was a $2,000 purse posted for these races but they were canceled due to flooding in the area.

 

June 15, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Great Bend Fairgrounds Track at Great Bend, Kansas

Breed entered his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            No results of these races have been located to date.

 

September 6, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds Racetrack at North Platte, Nebraska

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Although his engine went sour halfway through the 25-mile sweepstakes race, Breed managed to hold on to second place behind King Rhiley which was good enough for $750 of the day’s total purse of $6,000.

 

September 24, 1920

½ mile dirt oval – Lincoln County Fairgrounds Racetrack at North Platte, Nebraska

Breed drove his Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed finished second to Albert Preitauer in the third 10-lap heat race.  Breed then finished second to King Rhiley in the 50-lap sweepstakes race.

 

October 22 - 24, 1920

1-mile dirt oval - Fair Park Racetrack at the Texas State Expo in Dallas, Texas

Breed drove his white Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A)

            Breed had moved his family to Dallas, Texas before these races.  He was to compete in the third match race of a series here against Fred Horey on the 22nd but that event was postponed to the 23rd and then to the 24th before being finally canceled due to a too wet racetrack.

 

 

This publicity photo of Glenn Breed in his white Hudson “Super-Six” special appeared in the December 1, 1922 issue of “The Hudson Triangle” newsletter.

 

January 16, 1921

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed entered all six scheduled races that were run in conjunction with the third annual San Antonio Automobile Show.  He set a new one-lap track record of one minute and twenty-five seconds flat in qualifying.  He then proceeded to easily win each of the six races.

 

February 22, 1921

1 1/8-mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the 7-car, 5-lap “Free-for-All” race in 6 minutes, 45.2 seconds finishing 7.8 seconds ahead of second place finisher John Mais in his Dodge special.  Breed then won the 7 car, 10-lap final race in new track record time of 12 Minutes, 33.8 seconds finishing 7.4 second ahead of second place finisher John Mais in his Dodge Special. 

 

February 23, 1921

1 1/8-mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed finished first in the 10-lap “Free-for-All” in 11 minutes, 37.2 seconds which was 14.4 seconds ahead of the second place finisher, John Mais in his Dodge special.  Breed then won the 5-car, 5-lap final race in 5 minutes, 42.8 seconds which was only .2 of a second ahead of John Mais in his Dodge special.

 

February 27, 1921

1 1/8-mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

Breed entered his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

After only one race had been run, the remainder of this program was called off by the promoter.  Breed did not compete in the one race that was run.

 

March 12, 1921

1 1/8-mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed signed the contract with the racetrack as a representative of the drivers and then proceeded to set a new track record of 1 minute, 1.0 seconds in time trials breaking the old record, held by Elfreida Mais by 2.0 seconds.  (This was a non-sanctioned (or “outlaw”) race held outside the U.S.A. and women were allowed to compete.)

 

March 13, 1921

1 1/8-mile dirt oval -mile – Juarez Speedway in Juarez, Mexico

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won the second 5-lap heat race 6 minutes, 19.6 seconds, 1 second ahead of second place finisher, John Mais in a Dodge.  Breed then finished fourth in the 5-lap handicap race behind winner F. W. “Wolf” Koehler in a Mercer, Jack O’Connell in an Essex, and Bob Johnson in a Jefferys.  Breed then won a 3-lap match race in 3 minutes, 29.0 seconds defeating John Mais by 1.0 seconds.  Next, Breed finished second to John Mais in a 10-lap handicap race.  Breed finished first in the 5-lap “Free-for-All” race.  Breed and John Mais tied for first place in the Australian Pursuit race.

 

April 17, 1921

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: American Automobile Association (A.A.A.)

Breed suffered car trouble this day and did not complete a race.

 

April 20, 1921

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: American Automobile Association (A.A.A.)

No results of this race have been located to date.

 

April 24, 1921

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: American Automobile Association (A.A.A.)

            Breed competed in four races finishing in second place just 3.4 seconds behind Ira Vail in a Duesenberg in the first 20-mile event.  He also finished in second place 11 seconds behind Vail in a second 20-mile event that had started eight cars.  He then finished in second place just three seconds behind Vail in the third event which was 30 miles long.  By all accounts, Breed battled Vail for every lap of those three races.  Finally, Breed finished in third place behind John Mais driving a Dodge and John Boling driving the C. L. Richards special in the final event of the afternoon which was a 10-mile handicap race.  A crowd of 6,000 spectators was in attendance.

            Breed collected $1,870 from the total purse of $7,000.

 

July 4, 1921

5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed had moved his family to San Antonio, Texas by the time this race took place.   A crowed officially estimated at over 10,000 saw Breed win the second heat completing the five-mile distance in 5 minutes. 22.4 seconds.  He then won the five-mile fourth heat in 5 minutes, 25.4 seconds.   Finally, he finished first in the 25-mile “Free-for-All” covering that distance in 28 minutes and .4 seconds.  For his efforts, Breed collected $800 from the purse.

Glenn Breed

in 1941

Don Sparr collection

 

 

August 26, 1921

½ mile dirt oval – Iowa State Fair Racetrack in Des Moines, Iowa

Breed’s car is listed as having been a Frontenac.

Races sanctioned by: International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A.)

            Breed’s name does not appear in the incomplete published results of this race.

 

September 28, 1921

5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed won the third race, a five-mile “Free-for-All,” in 5 minutes, 22 seconds.  That one race paid a total purse of $350.  He then won a 10-mile “Free-for-All” handicap in a total of 11 minutes, 32 seconds over Phil “Red” Shafer, that time including one caution period.  The actually racing time for that race was 10 minutes, 43 seconds and the total purse for that one race was $650.

 

January 1, 1922

1-mile dirt oval - Fair Park Racetrack at the Texas State Expo in Dallas, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed set a new one-lap track record 49 seconds flat and then won a five-mile “Free-for-All” in a time of 4:27.  He took the lead over the nine other competitors on the seventh lap of the 15-mile “Free-for-All” and pulling away to win in a time of 13:08.  Again, Phil “Red” Shafer finished second in each of the races won by Breed.

 

June 18, 1922

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

           No results of this race have been located to date.

 

June 25, 1922

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

           Breed finished in fourth place in the 20-mile handicapped “Free-for-All” behind J. Hildebrandt driving his Southwestern special, Ed Eckenroth, and Joe Harder who was driving a DeLuxe special.  He made good time in the race but was unable to overcome the 4 minute, 25 second handicap that he had to give the other entrants.   Breed then won the 40-mile feature race in a time of 34 minutes, 30.2 seconds before a crowd estimated at between 3,500 and 4,000 fans.

 

July 4, 1922

5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            A crowd estimated at between 15,000 and 20,000 saw Breed finish fourth behind Phil “Red” Shafer in a Duesenberg, “Texas“ George Clark in a Hudson, and Ed H. Eckenroth in the 50-mile feature race but Breed was three laps behind the winner at the finish.  Shafer and Breed had competed against each other on numerous occasions over the years but this was the first time Shafer had finished ahead of Breed.  In an interview in 1936, Shafer said that finally being able to finish ahead of Glenn Breed had given him the confidence to tackle the big timers of the brick and board speedways.

 

Glenn Breed

c1950

Don Sparr collection

 

 

September 20, 1922

Dirt oval at Corpus Christi, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

No results of this race have been located to date. 

 

September 29, 1922

5/8 mile dirt oval – West Texas State Fairgrounds Racetrack at Abilene, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

The largest crowd in the history of the West Texas State Fair to that date (17,000 people) witnessed a fiery crash.  Breed’s Hudson was heavily damaged in the melee but he escaped injury. 

 

October 29, 1922

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Races sanctioned by: American Automobile Association (A.A.A.)

No results of this race have been located to date.

 

November 5, 1922

1.5 mile dirt oval – Gulf Coast Speedway at Houston, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

A crowd of 10,000 spectators looked on as Breed set the quickest time of the day in time trials and then won the final race of the day, a 24-mile “Free-for-All” in 18 minutes and 31 seconds which was 26 seconds faster than the second place finisher.

 

November 30, 1922

1.5 mile dirt oval – Gulf Coast Speedway at Houston, Texas

Breed drove his white #20 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won both the 18-mile race in a time of 13 minutes, 7 seconds and the 24-mile race in 17 minutes, 20 seconds.  Both were track record times.

 

May 27, 1923

1.5 mile dirt oval – East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed had moved his family to Austin, Texas when he entered these races.  He did not do well in this first appearance there with published reports saying that he was “out of the running.”

 

June 3, 1923

½ mile dirt oval – Gulf Coast Racetrack in Houston, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed won every race in which he was entered including the 24-mile final.  He gave all of the other cars in that race a half-mile head start and then covered the distance in 18 minutes, 24.0 seconds to take the victory.

 

June 17, 1923

1.5 mile dirt oval – East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Breed set a new one-lap track record of 65 seconds averaging 83.07 M.P.H.  He then completed the 9-lap “Free-for-All” in 9 minutes, 17.6 seconds against seven other cars finishing in second place six seconds behind Dick Calhoun in a Dodge.  The 18-lap feature race started with Dick Calhoun on the pole position while Breed had to start last in the field of seven cars.  Calhoun finished first just 7.2 seconds ahead of the second place driver – the by then fast closing Glenn Breed.

 

Glenn Breed

holding granddaughter Nan Sparr c1950

Don Sparr collection

 

 

September 3, 1923

1.5 mile dirt oval – East Texas Motor Speedway between Port Arthur and Beaumont, Texas

Breed drove his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

Never having been one to remain in one place for very long, Breed had moved his family to Corpus Christi, Texas by August of 1923 where he opened a small garage.  On this date, he set a new track record averaging 87 M.P.H. for 8-laps in his heat race and won the feature race by a large margin over the second place finisher.  When he climbed out of his Hudson, he is quoted in the local newspaper as having said:

“I’m through boys.  That was my last race.  I’m 36 years old (sic) and for over 20 years, I’ve flirted with the danger.  I’m through now.  I’m going back to Corpus and settle down in my garage business and say boys, the Hudson is for sale.  She is a good boat and faithful and say, if you take her, be good to her and she will turn the tracks.”

            As it turns out though, Breed did not retire from driving immediately.

 

October 21, 1923

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove both his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special and a stock Hudson speedster.

            Breed was presented the Roth Brothers silver cup for setting the fastest time in time trials of 1 minute, 21 seconds for one lap of the 2-mile oval.  He also won a 10-mile race for the fastest cars in time trials and then finished first in the 20-mile “Free-for-all” with a time of a fraction over 15 minutes.  Breed then drove a stock Hudson speedster in the stock car race running neck-in-neck with “Corrigan’s Marmon” for the lead for the first two laps before Breed dropped out with a leak in the car’s vacuum tank.

 

November 12, 1923

2-mile dirt oval – San Antonio Speedway at San Antonio, Texas

Breed drove both his white #5 Hudson “Super-Six” special.

            Breed was presented the Roth Brothers silver cup for setting the fastest time in time trials with a 1 minute, 19 seconds for one lap around the 2-mile oval which was a new track record for that distance that stood for nearly 4 years.  He also won a 10-mile race for the fastest cars in time trials with a time of 7 minutes, 8.8 seconds.  Breed then finished first the 20-mile “Free-for-All” with a time of 13 minutes, 52.7 seconds.

 

Breed did sell the Hudson “Super-Six” special to Herbert Haas of San Angelo, Texas the following winter and finally did retire from competitive driving.  By 1927, Glenn and his wife had moved to San Antonio, Texas where he worked as a mechanic for Marshall Ford’s Hudson – Essex dealership.

Ironically, Glenn was injured for the first time in an automobile accident in San Antonio, Texas in 1933.  He was hospitalized with his injuries but did fully recover.

In 1948, Glenn and Mattie Breed moved to Gobles, Michigan where he took a job at Gobles Auto Supply.  A year later, he moved to Paw Paw, Michigan where he rebuilt engines for the Troy Motor Company, a job he kept until his retirement.

Glenn and Mattie were both hospitalized with injuries they received in another auto accident west of Niles, Michigan in 1954.  Glenn passed away at his home in Paw Paw, Michigan on November 11, 1960 and is buried in Robinson Cemetery south of Gobles, Michigan.

After Glenn’s death, Mattie moved to Flour Bluff (now a part of Corpus Christi) Texas to be near her son and his family.  Less than a year later, she moved to Wichita, Kansas where she lived with a sister until her death in 1962.  She is buried in Old Mission Cemetery in Wichita.

Glenn’s step-son, Albert E. Sparr, resided at Corpus Christi, Texas where he passed away on July 1, 1965.

The above is believed to be just a small part of the racing career of Glenn Breed.  If you have any additional information about Glenn Breed, please contact Bob Lawrence.

 

 

Robinson Cemetery – Gobles, Michigan

Suzanne Breed photo

 

 

 

 

Glenn Breed a Star in Dirt Track Races

Has Won 26 Firsts in 27 Starts in His Hudson Special

          When sportswriters are recording the records and facts of automobile drivers on famous speedway tracks, the efforts of one dirt track driver are passed by unnoticed.  Glenn Breed who hails from Salina, Kansas, in the past two years has made a dirt track record with his Hudson special that should win him a niche in the hall of fame among racing drivers.  In the old days when Bob Burman was setting so many new marks on the speedway, he had a partner, Glenn Breed, who came in for little attention except that he was associated with this famous racing driver.

          In 27 entries, he has won 26 firsts.  In his last race at Dodge City, Iowa (sic.) on Labor Day, he finished first 15 miles ahead of the nearest car.  It is getting difficult for Breed to find contenders.  He averages on a good dirt track 90 miles an hour on the straightaways.  So far, all of his efforts have been confined to the Middle West and the Southwest.

          He does not move in a special train like some of the speedway drivers of today.  He just puts headlights on the front of the racing car that he built himself, straps a tire on the back, and travels from track to track.  He makes his own tire changes and generally carries no mechanican.

San Antonio Light

September 23, 1917 – Page 10

 

 

 

 

Glenn Breed

Glenn Milton Breed

Thank You:

Suzanne Breed, Michael A. Darrah, Galen Kurth, Ramona Sawyer Hill, Don and Donna Sparr

 

 

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