Jack Petticord

in 1934

Chillicothe (Missouri) Constitution-Tribune

 

  Jack Petticord

in May of 1934

Kirkpatrick photo from the Larry Korgal collection

“Iron Man”

Harold Homer “Jack” Petticord

1900 – 1940

1923  I.M.C.A. Canadian National Driving Champion 2

 

Harold Petticord was primarily a dirt track race car driver.  Although Harold would reside in places like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, he was born in Wichita, Kansas on November 21, 1900, the youngest of four children born to Lewis Gideon Petticord (1866-1902) and his wife, Viola Ellen (Blanchett) Petticord (1865-1953).  Harold was baptized on his first birthday at Saint John’s Episcopal Church at 402 North Topeka Street in Wichita.

Harold’s father had moved with a brother to Wichita from North Carolina in 1886 and had married Viola Blanchett in Sedgwick County, Kansas in 1888.  Viola was originally from North Carolina as well.  Lewis and Viola resided several different places in Wichita before settling with their young family in a home at 446 North Mosley Street in 1899.  Lewis’ ancestors had chosen various spellings the family surname.  For instance, Lewis’ father was Spruce McKaughan Peddicord (1824-1881) and Lewis’ grandfather was Keelon Peddycord (1783-1849).  Lewis was a teamster and become the owner-operator of the local Red Tank Line of horse-drawn fuel tank wagons with which he subcontracted the delivery of products for the Standard Oil Company.

Lewis Petticord suffered a stroke while delivering gasoline along his route in downtown Wichita in 1902 and passed away within hours after being taken to his home.  Harold Petticord was less than two years old at the time and his widowed mother was left to raise him and his three older siblings.

Viola Petticord’s attempts to continue operation of the Red Tank Line met with limited successful so, in 1904, she moved the family to the back of a storefront she had rented at 324 North Cleveland Street, northeast of downtown Wichita.  She opened a neighborhood grocery and confectionary, in the storefront part of the building, that was known as The Pop & Ice Cream Shop.  With help from her children, she operated those businesses until 1906 when she divested the family of the Red Tank Line.

By 1908, Viola had added “provisions, school supplies and notions” to the inventory and changed the name of The Pop & Ice Cream Shop to Fancy Groceries.

As a young boy, Harold Petticord sang with the boys’ choir at Saint John’s Episcopal Church.  As a teenager, he worked at the family’s soda fountain, delivered messages for Western Union and refereed basketball games at the local Y.M.C.A.

Petticord enlisted in the United States Army on July 31, 1917.  Since he was only 16 years old, he was assigned as a private to the Fifth Recruit Training Command of the United States General Service Infantry and received his basic training at Fort Logan, southwest of Denver, Colorado.  Due to his tender age, Petticord was then held in reserve in case he was actually needed in the war effort.  Although he was fully trained, the army eventually determined that he was not needed, so he did not take an active part in any of the war’s hostilities.

Petticord was honorably discharge on March 7, 1919 while still only 18 years old and still at the rank of private.  He then returned to Wichita where he shared an apartment at 316 South Main Street with his mother; his sister, Lola Josephine Petticord (1899-1970) and his brother, Leslie Lewis Petticord (1895-1951).  Another brother, 9-year-old William Walter Petticord (1893-1903), had died from blood poisoning after his foot was crushed below the ankle when he slipped while trying to climb aboard a train as it passed by the Petticord home.

Harold was the last of Viola Petticord’s children to leave home when he moved to Chicago in 1920 where he found work as a taxi cab driver.  Viola closed Fancy Groceries and took a job as cook & maid for an elderly widow; moving into a room in the widow’s home at 121 East Kellogg Street in Wichita.

Petticord got his first racing experience when he got a chance to drive a stent in relief for Johnny Raimey who was one of the Essex racing team’s top drivers in races sanctioned by the International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A.).  Petticord made the most of that opportunity by displaying a talent for being able to negotiate racetrack traffic quickly and smoothly, without becoming involved in accidents.

Following is an incomplete list of the auto races that Petticord entered:

  

 

Clarence “Norske” Larson in his own #8 Mooney special Ford that had been built by John Mooney.  Jack Petticord drove this car for owner Larson in I.M.C.A. sanctioned races at the Illinois State Fairgrounds at Springfield, Illinois on August 20, 1921.

The Old Motor collection

 

August 20, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Illinois State Fairgrounds at Springfield, Illinois – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #8 Mooney special Ford built by John Mooney and owned by Clarence “Norske“ Larson of St. Paul, Minnesota.

Finish:  Won a 5-mile heat race 1

 

September 8, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cedar Valley Fairgrounds at Cedar Falls, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  Fourth place in the first heat race behind Eddie Voitick in the “Mooney special” Ford, Rowe Brainerd in an Essex and O. T. Barr in an Essex.

               

September 16, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas Free Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:   Picked up $100 from the posted purse when he finished in second place behind winner Jack Stratton in an Essex in the first 6-lap race on the program.

Second in the first 4-car heat race, finishing just inches behind winner Rowe Brainerd who was driving an Essex.

            Led the 5-car, 6-lap “Free-for-All” until the final lap when he was overtaken by winner Cliff Craft in a Briscoe.

            Dropped out after the sixth lap of the 6-car. 10-lap Sunflower Sweepstakes race that was won by Jack Stratton who was driving an Essex

 

September 17, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas Free Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  After leading the first lap, he finished third in a 6-lap “light car” race behind Rowe Brainerd and O. T. Barr.  The first three finishers were all driving Essexes.

Third in the 5-car, 10-lap Topeka Sweepstakes race behind Cliff Craft in a Briscoe and Ed Burgett in the King special.

 

September 24, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 25, 1921 due to rain.

 

 

Jack Petticord in his yellow Essex special (an I.M.C.A. light car he called “Straw Streak”) posed on the racetrack at the Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas in October of 1922.  Petticord raced this car in I.M.C.A. sanctioned races in 1922 before winning the I.M.C.A. Canadian National Driving Championship while racing this car in 1923.

Fred Gildersleeve photo from the Christine Logan collection

 

September 25, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 26, 1921 due to rain.

 

September 26, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 27, 1921 due to rain.

 

September 27, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  These races were postponed until September 28, 1921 due to rain.

 

September 28, 1921 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tennessee State Fairgrounds in Nashville, Tennessee – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  Fourth in the 5-mile Tennessee Sweepstakes behind Ed Burgett in the King special, Cliff Craft in a Briscoe and Rowe Brainerd who was driving an Essex.

 

October 13, 1921 – 1 1/8 mile dirt oval – Southeast Fairgrounds at Atlanta, Georgia – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  Fourth in a 5-car, 3-mile race won by Fred Horey in an Essex.  Bob “Red” Maley finished second and Elmer Myers finished third.

 

October 14-15, 1921 – 1 1/8 mile dirt oval – Southeast Fairgrounds at Atlanta, Georgia – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  These were the second and third days of this 3-day racing event.  Since Petticord competed on the first day of these races, it is likely that he also competed on these two days well although his name does not appear in the published results of the races run on October 14th and the results of the races run on October 15th have yet to be located.

             

October 22, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mississippi State Fairgrounds at Jackson, Mississippi – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Mercedes special

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

             

October 30, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Louisiana State Fairgrounds at Shreveport, Louisiana – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  ” a yellow Mercedes special”

Finish:  Fourth place in a 5-mile, 4-car “class race” after having led the 3rd lap.  Johnny Raimey won the race in an Essex special.  Second place went to Eddie Voitick in the “Mooney special” Ford and third went to Larry Stone in an Essex special.

            Fifth place in the 5-car, 5-lap “Free-For-All” after experiencing engine trouble from the very first lap.  The “Free-for-All” was advertised as playing $1,000 to win.  It was won by Cliff Craft driving a Maxwell.  Eddie Burgett placed second in an Oldsmobile special.  Johnny Raimey finished third in an Essex special and fourth place went to Larry Stone who was also driving an Essex special.

             

November 6, 1921 – ½ mile dirt oval – Louisiana State Fairgrounds at Shreveport, Louisiana – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  ” a yellow Mercedes special”

Finish:  Third in a 5-mile race behind Emil “Speed” King and Johnny Raimey, both of whom were driving Essex specials.

                Was the first driver to drop out of the 5-car Australian Pursuit race that was won by E. King in an Essex.

 

Petticord returned home to Wichita where he took a job as an auto mechanic but he also accepted an offer to become a member the Essex racing team the following year.  His assignment with the team was to compete for the “light car” championship in races sanctioned by I.M.C.A., although he got a late start on the 1922 racing season.

 

Jack Petticord is shown here (driving his yellow #28 Essex special he called “Straw Streak”) during a race at the Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas in October of either 1922 or 1923.  Petticord raced there both years with the same automobile.

Bob Lawrence collection

 

 

July 4, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cedar Valley Fairgrounds at Cedar Falls, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  More information about these races has yet to be located.

   

July 7, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Tri-State Fairgrounds at Aberdeen, South Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Dropped out of 6-lap race.

                Third in a 5-mile race behind Fred Horey in a Fiat and Irwin “Putty” Hoffman driving a Case.

            Third in handicap race behind Bo Murray in a Stutz and Larry Stone in a Duesenberg.

   

July 8, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Tri-State Fairgrounds at Aberdeen, South Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

   

July 15, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Aurora Driving Park at Aurora, Illinois – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  An “ex-Raimey” Essex special

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

                   

 

This photo was taken at an I.M.C.A. sanctioned race at an unidentified racetrack in Eastern Canada in 1923 and shows Jack Petticord in his yellow #28 Essex special “Straw Streak” (second car from the right) taking the lead in a race that Petticord would go on to win.

The (Vass, North Carolina) Pilot

 

August 14, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mason City Fairgrounds at Mason City, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Third in the first 5-mile heat race behind Cliff Craft in the Wisconsin special and Fred Horey in a Fiat

Third in the 3-mile handicap race behind Larry Stone in a Duesenberg and Cliff Craft in the Wisconsin special

 

August 19, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds at Davenport, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Competed in a 6-car, 7-lap race but did not finish in the top three.  That race was won by Sig Haugdahl in a Duesenberg.

                Third in the 7-lap consolation race behind George Schultheis in an Essex and Bo Murray in a Stutz.

    

August 25, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Fourth in the 5-lap “special race” behind Cliff Craft driving the Elgin special, Larry Stone driving a Duesenberg and Irwin “Putty” Hoffman driving a Comet

 

September 4, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Nebraska State Fairgrounds in Lincoln, Nebraska – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Dropped out of his heat race with engine trouble

Had built up a substantial lead in the 5-lap consolation race before the third lap when engine problems forced him to retire from the event.  Fred Horey took the lead on the final lap of the consolation race and held onto it for the victory.

 

September 8, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Nebraska State Fairgrounds in Lincoln, Nebraska – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

This photo of an unidentified driver in the #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special, was taken at Ascot Speedway just east of Los Angeles, California and was published in a California newspaper in 1924.  It is known that Jack Petticord was the driver of the Anglin & Sund Ford special in several races at Ascot Speedway that year.

Ascot Speedway publicity photo

 

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Third behind Larry Stone in a Duesenberg and Bo Murray in a Stutz in the first 7-lap heat race.

Won the 5-lap consolation race in 3:03.8 over Cliff Hoffman who was driving a Comet

 

September 13, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas Free Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Competed in the 7-lap, 5-car, first heat race but did not finish in the top two.  This race was won by Fred Horey.

              Second in the 10-lap handicap race behind Louis Disbrow.  Petticord led this race from the beginning until being passed by Disbrow on the final lap.  There was a total of $200 prize money posted for this one race.

 

September 16, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas Free Fairgrounds in Topeka, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 4-car, 5-lap heat race behind Clyde Kelley in a Bugatti.

              Second in the 5-lap consolation race behind Bo Murray in a Stutz

 

September 17, 1922 – 1 mile dirt oval – Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Nebraska – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 10-mile heat race that was won by Fred Horey who was driving a Frontenac. 

 

September 22, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Kansas State Fairgrounds in Hutchinson, Kansas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  12,000

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in the first heat race just 6/10 of a second behind Irwin “Putty” Hoffman after Petticord led until the final lap when he began experiencing engine problems

Dropped out on the 8th lap of the 10-lap “International Handicap” race that was won by Larry Stone in a Duesenberg after Petticord again experienced engine problems

Dropped out with engine problems on the 6th lap of the 10-lap Sweepstakes race which was won by Fred Horey

 

October 4, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Oklahoma Free State Fairgrounds in Muskogee, Oklahoma – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Some of Jack Petticord’s Car Owners when He Raced in California

Harry Hooker

Lew Cody

“Hollywood” Bill White

Roland Frost

         Harry Hooker owned the #99 Hooker special that Petticord drove at the San Luis Obispo Fairgrounds in Paso Robles, California on May 31, 1925.

         Stage and silent movie actor, Lew Cody, owned a ‘183’ Miller race car that Petticord drove at Ascot Speedway in California in March of 1924.

         Petticord purchased his first Miller race car (the first Miller that he had owned himself) from “Hollywood” Bill White on June 3, 1924 and also drove a #12 Cunningham-Miller special owned by White in 1926 at Bakersfield, California.  Petticord competed in the 1927 Indianapolis 500 which was a race that was won by George Souders who was driving a Duesenberg owned by White.  Petticord also competed in the 1928 / 1929 unofficial A.A.A. Southwest Pacific Coast Winter Championship races and it is believed that the car he drove in those races was owned by White.

         Roland Frost owned the McDowell special #1 and the Frosty special #1 that Petticord drove when he raced in California early in 1926 and again early in 1928.

         All of these men were from Los Angeles, California except for Lew Cody who lived in Beverly Hills, California.

 

 

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 6-lap race for “light cars” in 3:44.2

              Second to Larry Stone in the Australian Pursuit

 

October 7, 1922 – ½ mile dirt oval – Oklahoma Free State Fairgrounds in Muskogee, Oklahoma – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

October 10, 1922 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fair Park at Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Did not place in any of the races

               

October 14, 1922 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fair Park at Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won the first 10-lap heat race in 4:35.0

                Second behind Glenn Howard who was driving a Fronty Ford in the 14-lap “light car” sweepstakes race.

 

October 15, 1922 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fair Park at Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Third behind Ted Rick and Glenn Howard who was driving a Fronty Ford in the first 10-lap race

                Second to Louis Disbrow in the 10-lap Australian Pursuit race

 

October 22, 1922 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in the 7-car, 7-lap, first heat race behind Irwin “Putty” Hoffman.

Fourth in the 4-car, 5-lap Australian Pursuit handicap race behind Sig Haugdahl in a Fronty Ford, Louis Disbrow in an Essex and Larry Stone in a Duesenberg.

Third in the 4-car consolation race behind Fred Horey in his #44 Gardner and Clyde Kelly in the Wisconsin special.

Third in the 7-car, 10-lap Sweepstakes race behind Sig Haugdahl in a Fronty Ford and Fred Horey who was driving the #44 Gardner.

 

October 24, 1922 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

The driver in this photo is unidentified but Jack Petticord drove this Conlin-Miller ‘183’ for owner Steve Elmore in some races on the west coast in the mid-1920s.

The Old Motor collection

 

Finish:  Third in the 7-lap race for “Light cars”.  Finishing ahead of Petticord in that race were Irwin “Putty” Hoffman in a Comet and Larry Stone in a Duesenberg.

              Second in the 6-lap consolation race behind Louis Disbrow in an Essex

             Won the second 5-lap heat race in 2:47.0

             Did not finish the 10-lap final race as Petticord dropped out with engine trouble.  That race was won by Sig Haugdahl who was driving a Frontenac.

 

October 29, 1922 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in the 6-lap race for “light cars” behind Joe Sandifer in the Mooney special Ford

              Second in the 9-lap Australian Pursuit handicap race behind Louis Disbrow in a Fiat

             Second in the 5-lap consolation race behind Irwin “Putty” Hoffman in a Comet special

  

November 5, 1922 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Cotton Palace Fairgrounds in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in the 4-car, 7-lap second qualifying heat for the Southern Derby won by Sig Haugdahl

Second in the 9-lap Australian Pursuit handicap race behind Louis Disbrow in a Fiat

              Third in the 4-car, 10-lap final qualifying heat for the Southern Derby behind Fred Horey and Sig Haugdahl.

                 

November 11-12, 1922 – 1 mile “round, oiled-dirt oval” – Maxwellton at St. Louis, Missouri – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the only meager published results of these races that have been located to date.

 

 

 Wichita Boy Helps Make Speed Records

Wichita (Kansas) Daily Eagle

November 15, 1922

Page 14

 

Jack Petticord, Wichita boy and professional racing demon, has returned to his home after spending the racing season on tracks in all parts of the country.  Petticord is a member of the Essex team which walked off with considerable money in various dirt track meets.  He has raced on the same team with Sig Haugdahl, world’s dirt track champion, and was at the meeting in St. Louis when Haugdahl broke all existing dirt track records on half-mile tracks (at distances) from one mile up to 15 miles.  Haugdahl has also made speed up to 180 m.p.h. on the beach at Daytona according to Petticord.  The Wichita racer hopes to bring a team of dirt track racers here next season who will set new marks on the local track, which he says is good enough to have first class racing on.

 

 

A month after Petticord returned home to Wichita in November of 1922, he and a high school teacher from Waco, Texas named Miss Lucile Walker, announced that they would be wed the following spring.  For some, as yet, undetermined reason, that engagement was broken.

Petticord was working as an auto mechanic and residing with his mother at the English Court House apartment house at 631½ North Market Street in Wichita, Kansas in 1923 but he soon left home for Canada to again travel extensively driving a race car for the Essex racing team on dirt oval racetracks sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

 

July 2, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – River Park in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won the first 4-lap heat race in 2:40.8

                Second behind Cleo Sarles who was driving a Ford in the second heat race.

 

 

The #2 Chrysler special that Jack Petticord was driving when he was seriously injured when he and 10 other drivers were involved in a double fatality accident at Ascot Speedway on July 10, 1926.

Jesper Hvid on the Fastlane Motorsports message board

July 6, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Brandon Exhibition Grounds at Brandon, Manitoba, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Ran in the first two 5-car heat races but did not place in the top three in either of them.  By the end of the day, Petticord had not finished in the money in any of the races in which he competed.

 

July 14, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Victoria Park in Calgary, Alberta, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won the 7-lap “Stampede Derby” for “light cars”

 

July 16, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Edmonton Exhibition Grounds at Edmonton, Alberta, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 7-lap heat race in 4:17.8

Won a 5-lap “Free-for-All” race in 3:05.5

            Second place behind Bill Robinhood who was driving a Premier in a 5-lap race for “light cars”

 

July 21, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Edmonton Exhibition Grounds at Edmonton, Alberta, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 7-lap race in 4:39.4

Lost a 2-car match race to Cleo Sarles

           

August 4, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Regina Exhibition Grounds at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 7-lap Class D Handicap race won by Ray Claypool

Won a 3-car match race over Ray Burr Lampkin and Fred Lecklider in 3:10.0

            Won a 2-car match race over Cleo Sarles in 3:26.0

 

August 25, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Canadian National Exhibition at Toronto, Ontario, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 5-lap heat race in 3:02.4

 

August 27, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Canadian National Exhibition at Toronto, Ontario, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 7-lap heat race, finishing just a few feet behind Emory Collins

 

 

1925 publicity photo of Jack Petticord in the #12 Little Joe Brady special that was owned by Culver City, California auto dealer, Dewitt J. Brady.  The car had been named in honor of Brady’s new baby son, Dewitt Joseph “Little Joe” Brady, Jr. (1924-2007)

Bakersfield (California) Morning Echo newspaper

 

August 31, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Sherbrooke Fairgrounds at Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 2-car match race won by Fred Lecklider

                Second in the 4-car, 7 lap-final race for “light cars” won by Fred Lecklider

 

September 14, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Central Canada Exhibition at Ottawa, Ontario, Canada – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 5-lap heat race for “light cars”

 

September 21, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Eastern States Expo Speedway at West Springfield, Massachusetts – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Third in a 7-lap heat behind Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac and Bill Robinhood who was driving a Dort.

                Won a 5-lap in 3:23.5, finishing in front of Ray Burr Lampkin who was driving Peugeot.

            Third in the 5-lap feature race behind Ray Burr Lampkin in a Peugeot and Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac.

 

September 22, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Eastern States Expo Speedway at West Springfield, Massachusetts – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won a 5-lap race in 3:10.0, finishing in front of Cleo Sarles who was driving a Frontenac.

                Second in the 10-lap feature race behind Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac.

 

September 28, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Inter-State Fairgrounds at Trenton, New Jersey – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  “a large crowd”

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won the second 5-lap heat race for “light cars” finishing just in front of Cleo Sarles who was driving a Fronty Ford.

               Petticord did not finish in either of the first two positions in the feature race for “light cars”.  Bill Robinhood finished first in that race driving a Dort automobile.  Ray Burr Lampkin finished second driving a Peugeot.

 

September 29, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Inter-State Fairgrounds at Trenton, New Jersey – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in a 5-lap race behind Bill Robinhood.

                Fifth in a 5-lap race behind Ray Claypool in a Flint, Ray Burr Lampkin in a Peugeot, Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac and Louis Disbrow in a Durant

Second in a 7-lap handicap race behind Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac.

Fourth in the 7-lap feature race behind Ray Burr Lampkin in a Peugeot, Ray Claypool in a Flint and Cleo Sarles in a Frontenac..

 

 

Billy Reed is shown here in the #99 Hooker special, Model T with a Miller DOHC head.  The car was owned by Harry Hooker.  Petticord drove this car in A.A.A. sanctioned races at the San Luis Obispo Fairgrounds in Paso Robles, California on May 31, 1925, only to suffer a broken crankshaft and be the first to drop out of the feature event.  Petticord might have considered himself to be lucky though.  Two drivers (Billy Reed and John Kemp) had already been killed in 1925, while driving this car, and a third driver (Gene Bingham) would lose his life in it before the year was through.  Kemp had been killed just one week before Petticord raced this car.

Clamshack at Flickr

 

October 6, 1923 – 1 1/8 mile dirt oval – Southeast Fairgrounds at Atlanta, Georgia – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  10,000

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Won the 3-lap “light car” race in 2:56.0, finishing in front of “Pop” Dally who was driving a Duesenberg.

Third in the 5-lap Southeastern Sweepstakes race behind Ray Burr Lampkin who was driving a white Peugeot and Fred Lecklider who was driving the Earl special.

 

October 13, 1923 – 1 1/8 mile dirt oval – Southeast Fairgrounds at Atlanta, Georgia – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Petticord Special Essex

Finish:  Second in a 3-mile race behind Cleo Sarles who was driving a Dort.

            Won the 4-lap consolation race in 3:45.0., finishing in front of Fred Lecklider who was driving a Stutz.

 

October 15, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mississippi State Fairgrounds at Jackson, Mississippi – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Petticord Special Essex

Finish:  Did not place a 5-lap heat race won by Larry Stone who was driving a Simplex.

             Did not place a in the 7-lap Australian Pursuit handicap also won by Larry Stone.

 

October 28, 1923 – ½ mile oiled dirt oval – Texas Cotton Palace in Waco, Texas – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Second in the 5-lap Invitational race behind Eddie Dailey in a Duesenberg

 

November 2, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Sandhills Fairgrounds at Pinehurst, North Carolina – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

November 9, 1923 – ½ mile dirt oval – Sandhills Fairgrounds at Pinehurst, North Carolina – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Yellow #28 Essex special named “Straw Streak”

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

Petticord was recognized as the unofficial I.M.C.A. Canadian National Driving Champion for 1923.2  He then left the Essex racing team to except an offer to drive a Fronty Ford in races at the New Ascot Speedway then being built at Lincoln Heights on the east edge of Los Angeles, California.  Petticord moved to Southern California where he could compete in weekly I.M.C.A. sanctioned racing programs at least 10 months out of the year.  That meant racing more often with much less travel involved.  Doing well against the formidable California competition would also increase his chances of getting to drive in the Indianapolis 500.

  

February 17, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  26,000

Car:  Fronty Ford special

Finish:  Second in the 10-lap Invitational race behind Floyd Roberts in an Essex

  

 

Jack Petticord in the Steve-Elmore-owned #8 ‘183’ Miller 8 (ex-Conlin Miller) and surrounded by his crew in 1926.  The car had been re-numbered from the #9 it had been in 1925.

Don Radbruch collection

 

February 24, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  35,000

Car:  Fronty Ford special

Finish:  Ralph DePalma won the 20-lap George Washington Sweepstakes race but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of the races run on this afternoon.

 

March 2, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  10,000+

Car:  Fronty Ford special

Finish:  These races were canceled due to rain.

 

March 8, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Petticord took part in a practice session on this date but no organized races were held.

 

March 9, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.  The 20-lap feature race was won Eddie Meyer driving his own Rajo.

 

March 16, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Competed with 11 other entrants in the Melvil Hall Sweepstakes but full results of that 20-lap feature race (won by Leon Duray driving “Hollywood Bill” White’s #3 Miller) have yet to be located

 

March 23, 1924 5/8 mile high banked oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund

Finish:  These races were postponed until March 30, 1924 due to rain.

 

March 30, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  183 cubic inch Miller Straight 8 owned by stage and silent movie actor, Lew Cody of Beverly Hills, California.  (This may have been the Conlin-Miller that was originally built for Hal Conlin earlier in 1924.)  Lew Cody had tried to hire Petticord a few weeks earlier but Roy St. Clair would not let Petticord out of his contract to drive for him.

Finish:  Ralph DePalma won the 15-lap Dorothy Vernon Sweepstakes.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

April 13, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  The 15-lap feature race was won by Leon Duray in “Hollywood Bill” White’s #3 Miller.  Although he entered, Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

The photo was taken at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in May of 1927 and shows Jack Petticord seated in the white, blue & red, 91-cubic inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller 8 special that he qualified for, and then drove in, the Indianapolis 500 that year.

Jeff Adams collection

 

April 20, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  30,000

Car:  Fronty Ford special owned by Arthur “Fuzzy” Davidson

Finish:  Second in the 5-lap, First heat race behind Gus Schrader

 Won the 10-lap Invitational race in 5:49.2.  Floyd Roberts finished in second place.

  

April 27, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Fronty Ford special owned by Arthur “Fuzzy” Davidson

Finish:  Won the 10-lap Invitational final race in 5:33.6.  Bill Lind finished in 2nd place.

 

May 3, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund

Finish:  Only exhibition laps were run on this afternoon.  There were no races.

 

May 4, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Won the 10-lap Invitational final race in 5:52.0.  Floyd Roberts finished in second place.

  

May 11, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Frank Lockhart led the 10-lap Invitational until the final lap when Lockhart swerved to miss a spinning car and Petticord slipped by him on the inside to take the victory in a total time of 5:44.6.

 

Jack Petticord was married to Miss Marie Elizabeth “Betty” Jearls on May 13, 1924 in Los Angeles, California and the couple left for a traditional honeymoon trip to Niagara Falls, New York although this one included a visit to Rochester, New York so that Jack could take part in another race.   The couple had first met when they were schoolmates in Wichita, Kansas.

 

May 30, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval – Rochester Fairgrounds in Rochester, New York – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  12,000+

Finish:  Petticord won $100 from the purse when he finished fourth in the 15-lap Free-for-All behind Larry Stone, who was driving a Simplex special; Louis Disbrow and Gene Purve, who was driving a Fiat.  This race was shortened from the scheduled 25-laps due to a badly rutted racetrack. 3

 

Upon their return to the West Coast, the couple made their home in Los Angeles.  This marriage eventually ended in divorce.

On June 3, 1924, Petticord received the first installment from an estate left to him after the passing of a maternal uncle.  Later that same day, he used a large chunk of that money to purchase the #3 Durant special, 183-cubic-inch White-Miller straight-8 bobtail (that Leon Duray had been driving) from the car’s owner, “Hollywood” Bill White.

Hoping to land the lead role in the remake of the 1923 silent film comedy, “Six Cylinder Love”, actor Harland Tucker persuaded Jack Petticord to tutor him in the art of fast driving at the New Ascot Speedway.  If Tucker got the part, Petticord was to be his stunt double.  Actor Spencer Tracy was awarded the lead role nullifying Tucker’s arrangement with Petticord.

 

June 8, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Third in the 15-lap Jack Doyle Handicap race behind Leon Duray and Ralph DePalma

 

June 17, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  1902 Ford #999 then owned by William L. Hughson (and now owned by the Ford Motor Company) and a #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  This was a practice date for drivers Petticord, Ralph DePalma, Steve Elmore, Frank Lockhart and Leon Duray.  They took turns running demonstration laps in the ex-Barney Oldfield 1902 Ford #999.  Petticord ran the fastest single lap in the car that day of 52.0 seconds.

 

June 22, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  13,000

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers E. Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund.

Finish:  Second in the 1-lap Italian Colony Victory Crown dash finishing ½ car length behind Leon Duray.

Won the 10-lap finals of the Chateau-Thierry handicap in 7:11.0, beating second place finisher, Ellis “Ed” Bermuda who was driving a Hudson.

               Won the Pershing handicap race in 8:05.0, beating second place Steve Elmore.

Fourth behind Leon Duray, Steve Elmore and Cliff Bergere in the 7-car Jack Dempsey Handicap race.  Heavyweight boxing champion, Jack Dempsey, served as starter for the races and presented the prize money to the winner.

 

 

Jack Petticord beside the white, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller 8 special at Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana on July 10, 1927.

Murawski collection

 

June 29, 1924 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by the American Automobile Association (A.A.A).

Car:  #101 Anglin & Sund Ford special sponsored by (and possibly owned by) Los Angeles Ford dealers, Rex Anglin & Roy F. Sund and the #3 White-Miller ‘183’ straight-8 Petticord had purchased from “Hollywood” Bill White

Finish:  Ran the second fastest time trial in the #3 White-Miller ‘183’ of 47.6 and the sixth fastest time of 51.0 in the Fronty Ford special.  Leon Duray had the fastest time with a run of 44.2.

            Won the 10-mile Morning Echo Handicap race in the #3 White-Miller 8 in 8:20.6

   

July 2-4, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval – Culver City Speedway at Culver City, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #3 White-Miller ‘183’ straight-8 Petticord had purchased from “Hollywood” Bill White.

Finish:  Petticord was listed as “not ready to qualify” on the first day.  Those on that list were to be given another chance to qualify on the second day but no further mention of Petticord has been located to date.

   

July 27, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval – Seaside Park at Ventura, California

Attendance:  5,000

Car:  #3 White-Miller ‘183’ straight-8 Petticord had purchased from “Hollywood” Bill White.

Finish:  Lost a wheel on the final lap of the 15-lap Ventura Sweepstakes but was still credited with a fourth-place finish behind Leon Duray, Frank Lockhart and Floyd Roberts.

 

August 23, 1924 – 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  #3 White-Miller ‘183’ straight-8 Petticord had purchased from “Hollywood” Bill White.

Attendance:  10,000

Finish:  These were the first night races run under the lights on the west coast.  Thomas Edison was a fan of auto racing and pushed a button in his laboratory in Orange, New Jersey, that turned the lights on at the racetrack this evening.  In return, the feature race was named the Thomas A. Edison Sweepstakes.  The race was won by Frank Lockhart but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

   

August 26, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval – Seaside Park at Ventura, California

Attendance:  5,000

Car:  #3 White-Miller ‘183’ straight-8 Petticord had purchased from “Hollywood” Bill White.

Finish:  Lost a wheel on the final lap of the 15-lap Ventura Sweepstakes but was still credited with a fourth-place finish behind Leon Duray, Frank Lockhart and Floyd Roberts.

   

August 30, 1924 – 1 mile dirt oval – Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at West Allis, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #14 Stutz

Finish:  Second in a 3-mile heat race behind Emil “Speed” King who was driving a Miller.

              Either second or third in a 5-mile heat race behind winner Cliff Woodbury who was driving a Frontenac.

 

Petticord sold his #3 White-Miller 183-cubic inch, straight-8, to Eddie Hearne in August of 1924.

According to one newspaper article, Jack Petticord spent much of the summer and fall of 1924, attempting to defend his 1923 Canadian National Driving Championship, but the article does not say where he raced in Canada, nor have the results of any of those Canadian races been located.  Another California newspaper article says that he was away racing “in the East,” while still another newspaper claimed that Petticord simply took that time off from racing.  Whatever the case, we do know that he traveled to Detroit, Michigan during the fall and acquired a new Fronty Ford racing car directly from Louis Chevrolet.

               

September 12, 1924 – ½ mile dirt oval – Northern Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #14 Stutz

Finish:  Won the second 5-car heat race in 3:15.25, finishing in front of Emil “Speed” King who was driving a Miller.

           Won the 3-car “special match race” in 4:27.5 over Emil “Speed” King in his Miller.

            Third place in the final heat race behind Jack Murray who was driving the Wisconsin special and Reddy Reher who was driving a Duesenberg.

            Second in the 6-car Ajax Trophy Race behind Reddy Reher in a Duesenberg.

 

October 26, 1924 – 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Finish:  Although entered, Petticord did not appear at these races as he had lost his credentials including his bank book and pass to Ascot Speedway, in a train station in San Francisco, California.  The papers were later found on the body of a man who had been involved in a fatal car accident near San Jose, California, leading to erroneous reports that Petticord had been involved in the accident himself.

               

October 29, 1924 – 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Attendance:  2,000

Car:  Petticord is believed to have driven the Harry-Heinle-owned #8 Frontenac from Chicago

Finish:  Only exhibition laps were run on this afternoon.  There were no races.

 

November 2, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Attendance:  12,000

Car:  Petticord is believed to have driven the Harry-Heinle-owned #8 Frontenac from Chicago in time trials, the Italian Victory Crown dash and the Babe Ruth Sweepstakes.  He then turned the car over to Chance Kingsley who drove it in the 15-lap Walter Johnson handicap race.

 

Al Melcher is shown here in the red & blue, Charles-Haase-owned, #44 Miller before the 1927 Indianapolis 500.  After the #22 Miller, that was being driven by Jack Petticord, dropped out of the race with supercharger trouble, Fred Lecklider & Petticord drove this car in relief for Melcher until it also developed problems with its supercharger forcing the Miller out of the race.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

 

Finish:  Petticord ran the fastest time in time trials of 32.4 seconds for one lap.

              Petticord won the 1-lap Italian Victory Crown dash in 32.4 seconds after following Ralph Ormsby until the final straightaway and then beating him to the finish line by just a few feet.

              Petticord finished third in the 10-lap Babe Ruth Sweepstakes race behind Ralph Ormsby and Frank Lockhart.

Chance Kingsley won the 15-lap Walter Johnson handicap race.

 

Petticord purchased a #25 “eight-in-a-row Duesenberg of the board track type” on November 6, 1924.

 

November 16, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Attendance:  12,000

Car: “new #25 Duesenberg board track car”

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

November 27, 1924 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Attendance:  30,000

Car: “#25 Duesenberg board track car”

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races so he did not finish in the top ten in the 50-lap feature race which was won by Frank Lockhart.  The purse was not paid for these races bringing about the temporary closing of the racetrack and then its sale, along with several lawsuits.

 

March 15, 1925 5/8 mile dirt oval – San Jose Speedway at San Jose, California

Car:  Thought to be the Clarence-Tarbet-owned #27 Miller

Finish:  Won the 20-lap feature race in 10:20.0

 

March 22, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tanforan at San Mateo, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Thought to be the Clarence-Tarbet-owned #27 Miller

Finish:  Won a 10-mile preliminary race in 9:03.8

 

March 29, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Arizona State Fairgrounds at Phoenix, Arizona – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #25 Duesenberg special

Finish:  Fourth in time trials behind the #2 Miller special driven by Ralph DePalma, the #27 Miller special driven by Frank Lockhart and the #16 Miller special driven by Eddie Hearne.  Petticord ran one lap of the racetrack in 47.4

Fourth in the 5-mile dash for the four fastest cars in time trials.  #2 Ralph DePalma won with #27 Frank Lockhart second and #16 Eddie Hearne in third place.

Fourth in the 20-mile “Free-for-All” race behind Ralph DePalma, Frank Lockhart and Eddie Hearne.  Petticord drove the only Duesenberg in the race.

 

April 11, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fair Park at Dallas, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  7,500

Finish:  Fifth in the 10-car, 100-lap Southwest Century race behind Ralph DePalma in a Miller special, Red Shafer in a Duesenberg, Earl DeVore in a Miller and Wade Morton in a Duesenberg.  The good news was that the total purse was $25,000.  The bad news for Petticord was that the entire purse was divided among the first three finishers.

 

 

This blue & red #26 Duesenberg, owned by Henry W. “Hank” Maley, was originally designated to be driven by Jack Petticord in the 1928 Indianapolis 500 but, when Petticord failed to get the car up to qualifying speed, Ira Hall (shown here seated in the car) was given a chance to qualify it.  Hall then qualified the car in the 27th position and was the car’s starting driver in the race.  Petticord relieved Hall on the 104th lap and drove the Duesenberg until he was involved in a minor accident that put him out of the race on the 115th lap.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

 

May 10, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  10,000

Car:  #12 Little Joe Brady special owned by Dewitt J. Brady 4

Finish:  Petticord was replaced in the car by Freddie Lyons of San Jose, California before qualifying took place.

 

May 31, 1925 – ½ mile dirt oval – San Luis Obispo Fairgrounds at Paso Robles, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #99 Hooker special Model T with a Miller DOHC head, owned by Harry Hooker

Finish:  Third in time trials behind Babe Strapp and Jack Logan

            Second in the second 15-lap heat behind Babe Strapp

            Last in the 10-car main event when a crankshaft broke on the 9th lap.  Mike Moosie won this 40-lap race.

 

June 14, 1925 5/8 mile dirt oval – San Jose Speedway at San Jose, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #12 Little Joe Brady special owned by Dewitt J. Brady.4

Finish:  Third in the first 15-lap heat race behind the #25 Brady special driven by Babe Stapp and the #21 Frontenac driven by Mel Kenealy.

 

 July 4, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Santa Rosa Speedway at Santa Rosa, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  Mel Kenealy won the 15-mile main event driving the DeWitt Brady special.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of the races run on this afternoon.

 

September 6, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tanforan at San Mateo, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Petticord’s own #8 Miller ‘183’

Posted Purse:  $6,000

Finish:  Won the 50-mile Diamond Jubilee Classic over second place, Eddie Hearne, in 49:08.0.  It appears that, years later, Petticord looked back on this race as the biggest and single most important victory of his racing career.

 

September 12, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Tanforan at San Mateo, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Petticord’s own #8 Miller ‘183’

Finish:  Second to Frank Lockhart in the 35-mile Diamond Jubilee race

  

October 7, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California

Car:  #21 Murphy-Miller owned by the Jimmy Murphy estate and entered by Babe Doyle who was a cousin of the late Jimmy Murphy who had been fatally injured in this same car at Syracuse, New York on September 15, 1924

Finish:  Ran 5 laps in 3:51.0 in an exhibition run to promote the races to be run at the Kerns County Fairgrounds on October 10, 1925

 

October 10, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #21 Murphy-Miller owned by the Jimmy Murphy estate and entered by Babe Doyle who was a cousin of the late Jimmy Murphy who had been fatally injured in this same car at Syracuse, New York on September 15, 1924

Finish:  Second to Frank Lockhart who was driving a Miller special that was built and owned by Harry A. Miller of Los Angeles, California in the 5-mile race for the five fastest cars in time trials.        

Second some 600 feet behind Frank Lockhart in the 25-mile feature race.  Petticord collected $400 for the feat.

 

November 1, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Santa Rosa Speedway at Santa Rosa, California

Car:  #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’ owned by Steve Elmore

Finish:  The 25-mile feature race was won by Fred Howard.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

  

 

This is the White-Miller ‘183’ Durant special bobtail that had been driven in races by Leon Duray and that Jack Petticord purchased (with his inheritance) from car owner, “Hollywood” Bill White on June 3, 1924.  This photo had been taken in March of 1924, which was before Petticord owned the car, and he is not in this photo.  It was a publicity photo touting a race that was run at the New Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California on March 30, 1924.  Those who are pictured here are, left to right: Lottie Pickford; her sister, Mary Pickford; their brother, Jack Pickford; Ralph DePalma, Sig Haugdahl, Leon Duray (whose real name was George Stewart) and an unidentified man holding the Dorothy Vernon sterling silver cup donated by Mary Pickford to be presented to the winner of the race by Lottie Pickford.  Petticord only raced this car for a couple of months before selling it to Eddie Hearne in August of 1924.

Buildy collection

 

November 22, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Stockton Fairgrounds at Stockton, California

Car:  #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’ owned by Steve Elmore

Finish:  Races postponed until November 29, 1925

  

November 29, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Stockton Fairgrounds at Stockton, California

Car:  #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’ owned by Steve Elmore

Finish:  Races postponed until December 6, 1925

  

December 6, 1925 – 1 mile dirt oval – Stockton Fairgrounds at Stockton, California

Car:  Probably the #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’ owned by Steve Elmore although it may have been the #21 Doyle-Murphy Miller.

Finish:  Won a match race over Fred Frame who was driving the #20 Tarbet-McDonald Miller.

            Third in the 25-mile main event behind Lou Moore in a Ford McDowell and Fred Frame.

                   

January 1, 1926 – ½ mile dirt oval – Banning Fairgrounds at Banning, California

Car:  #1 McDowell special owned by Roland Frost

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.  Bert Spencer won the 20-lap final race.

                   

February 7, 1926 – 1 1/8 mile dirt oval – Juarez Speedway at Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico

Finish:  Petticord entered these races but his name does not appear in the published results.  The feature race was won by Leon Duray.

 

February 14, 1926 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #12 Cunningham-Miller special owned by “Hollywood” Bill White

Finish:  These races were postponed until February 21, 1926.

  

February 21, 1926 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kerns County Fairgrounds at Bakersfield, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #12 Cunningham-Miller special owned by “Hollywood” Bill White

Finish:  Frank Lockhart won the 25-mile Sweepstakes but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of the races run on this afternoon.

 

February 22, 1926 – ½ mile dirt oval – Douglas Fairgrounds at Douglas, Arizona – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’ owned by Steve Elmore

Finish:  Broke a rear axle in a preliminary race and was unable to start the 50-mile race that was won by Harold Peterson of Phoenix, Arizona

 

May 23, 1926 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  Duesenberg.  (A report in the Los Angeles Times newspaper says that Howard Ney drove this Duesenberg in these races but other available evidence indicates that the driver was Petticord instead.)

Finish:  Second in a 15-lap race behind Fred Frame who was driving a Miller.

Won the 20-lap feature race over Fred Frame by 1½ car lengths in 10:39.0.

 

June 6, 1926 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  #8 Miller ‘183’ (former #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’, now rebuilt with a single-seat body) owned Steve Elmore

Attendance:  5,000

Finish:  Won the 20-lap feature race in 10:42.0

 

June 20, 1926 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  #2 Chrysler special owned by Ray Logan

Finish:  Won the 10-lap Hollywood consolation race in 5:36.0

            Won the 15-lap Riverside Sweepstakes, finishing in front of Byron W. “Speed” Hinkley.

 

An article on page 23 of the June 13, 1926 issue of the Los Angeles Times states that Jack Petticord was “the present Pacific Coast champion.”  The article does not say who, or what organization, crowned him champion and no other reference to any such championship has been located to date.  The newspaper probably named Petticord as such simply because he was the defending feature race winner at Ascot Speedway when the article was written.  The A.A.A. did not award a Pacific Coast championship until 1929.

Petticord and Ted Simpson, both received indefinite suspensions from A.A.A. for “competing on outlaw tracks” in 1926.  Petticord’s suspension was lifted just in time for him to compete in the Indianapolis 500 the following year.

 

July 3-5, 1926 – 1¼ mile oiled dirt oval – New Reno Motor Speedway at Reno, Nevada

Car:  #8 Miller ‘183’ (former #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’) owned Steve Elmore

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

July 5, 1926 5/8 mile dirt oval West Texas State Fairgrounds at Abilene, Texas – Sanctioned by A.A.A

                Car:  Petticord was entered to drive a Duesenberg and Ted Simpson was entered to drive Ray Logan’s #2 Chrysler but, since both were on suspension from A.A.A, .neither one competed.

 

July 10, 1926 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Attendance:  3,000

Car:  #2 Chrysler special owned by Ray Logan

Finish:  Just before 9:30 p.m. during the 15-lap consolation race, cars driven by Bill Bundy and Jack Petticord were coming out of a turn and heading down the front straightaway by the pits.  Petticord's car was high along the outside rail before he slid down the track where his left front wheel locked with the right rear wheel of the car driven by Bundy. The two cars were then hit by a third car, driven by C.D. "Pop" Evans, and the three vehicles skidded together toward the pit area where 21-year-old driver Nick Guglielmi was standing close to the racetrack.  Guglielmi had competed in a race earlier that evening and was having a conversation in the pit area, apparently unaware of what was happening on the track.  Police Lieut. Judson D. Cornwall ran into the crowded pit area to warn Guglielmi and other drivers and mechanics to move away from the track, just as the three vehicles slammed into them.  Cornwall and Guglielmi were crushed to death.  Petticord suffered a fractured skull, broken leg, internal injuries and was in a coma for a time.  Bundy suffered a cut on his leg while mechanic Eugene Hartman received a broken right ankle and possible internal injuries.  Mechanic Fred Heisler was also seriously injured.  More than 20 others were less seriously injured and there were 11 cars involved by the time it was over.  This was arguably the worst accident in the history of Ascot Speedway but just one of three serious accidents that Petticord survived during his racing career.  The other two occurred during races at Memphis, Tennessee in 1931 and 1932.

                   

November 11, 1926 – ½ mile dirt oval – Banning Fairgrounds at Banning, California

Car:  #1 McDowell special owned by Roland Frost

Finish:  Although Petticord was entered in these races, his name does not appear in the published results.  He was still recovering from the injuries he suffered at Ascot Speedway on July 10th.  Lou Moore won the 20-lap final race over Dale Pence and Ted Simpson.

 

Petticord missed the rest of 1926 recovering from his injuries. 5

In late February, or early March, of 1927 and with sponsorship from the Boyle Valve Company of Chicago, Illinois; driver Cliff Woodbury began assembling the Boyle Valve racing team headquartered at 1701 Gent Avenue in Indianapolis, Indiana.  The team was to place their emphasis on winning the Indianapolis 500.

 

January 1-2, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – All American Speedway at Albuquerque, New Mexico – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Car:  Petticord entered a Miller (probably the #8 Miller ‘183’, former #26 Conlin-Miller ‘183’, owned Steve Elmore)

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.  He was apparently applying to A.A.A. for reinstatement from his suspension but was not allowed to start.  George Souders won the 25-lap main event driving the Tarbet Miller.  Chet Gardner finished second in his Gardner Rajo and Harry Milburn finished third in his newly-purchased #12 White Miller.  The same three cars finished in the same positions on both days.

 

February 20, 1927 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California

Car:  #25 Chamberlain-Thiele Chrysler special

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  Although entered, it is likely that Petticord did not compete in these “outlaw” races since he was hoping to be reinstated by A.A.A.  Lou Moore won the 80-lap main event in a #5 Ford McDowell.  He was followed by Bert Spencer in the #6 Meyer Rajo and Ed Winfield in his own #1 car.

 

May 15, 1927 – ½ mile dirt oval – Lake County Fairgrounds at Crown Point, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Miller special

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  The 20-mile feature race was won by Charles Bauman followed by Jack Ross and Fred Harvey.

 

May 22, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fort Miami Speedway in Maumee, Ohio – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Miller special

Finish:  The Miller special Petticord was driving, broke a connecting-rod on the 93rd lap of the 100-lap race that was won by Shorty Cantlon in a Frontenac.  Chet Miller finished second in the Leopardi special and Harry Milburn finished third in his new #12 White Miller. 

 

May 30, 1927 – 2½ mile brick oval – Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Attendance:  150,000

Car:  White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special originally built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury.  Petticord also drove a new green (although one source says that it was red & blue) #44 Miller owned by Charles Haase.

Qualified:  There is no known record that Petticord was a member of the Boyle Valve racing team before the first day of time trials (May 26, 1927) but, on that date, he ran the 11th fastest time in time trials at 109.920 m.p.h. in car #22 which turned out to be the 14th fastest qualifying time when time trials were completed.  That was almost exactly 15 seconds faster than Woodbury had run in time trials in the same car a year earlier.  This was one of the oldest cars to make the starting field and the fastest of those rebuilt for the 91-cubic-inch-displacement formula.  All of the cars that had qualified faster had been built in either 1926 or 1927.

Joe Caccia of Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania was approved to be on standby in case Petticord needed a relief driver.  Caccia had never driven at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway before and he did not get a chance to do so this year either.  Caccia did qualify for, and participate in, the Indianapolis 500 in 1930, officially starting in the 14th position and finishing in 25th place after crashing on the 43rd lap.  Caccia and his riding mechanic were both killed in a practice crash at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway while preparing for qualifying for the 1931 Indianapolis 500.

Finish:  After making three pit stops on consecutive laps, Petticord retired from the race after 22 laps with supercharger problems on the 91-cubic-inch., #22 Boyle Valve Miller special.  He was credited with the 32nd place finish for which he won $320.

Petticord drove in relief for Al Melcher later in that same race.  It is unclear just how many laps Petticord drove in the #44 Miller.  He got into that car on the 44th lap when the car was scored in 17th place of the 23 cars still in the race.  The car had run slow but trouble-free up until that point.  Petticord then made two pit stops in quick succession, dropping the car to last place in the running order.  The car stopped two more times before it retired and, (according to one source) on the last of those two stops, Fred Lecklider took over as driver.  The supercharger broke one lap later putting the car out of the race.  A second source says that Petticord had been relieved by Lecklider for laps 130-143 and then Petticord got back in the car in an attempt to complete the race.  Whichever is correct, the car completed 144 laps of the 200-lap distance before it experienced the problem with its supercharger.

Race leader, George Souders, was less than a dozen laps from completing the race when the #44 Miller retired.  The Charles Haase-owned Miller officially finish in 20th position winning $490 from the purse.  The race was won by George Souders who was driving a Duesenberg owned by “Hollywood” Bill White, who had been one of Petticord’s occasional car owners when he had raced in California.

 

June 5, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Michigan State Fairgrounds at Detroit, Michigan – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Probably the white, blue & red, 91-cubic inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Retired from the 100-mile race for an unknown reason.  The race was won by Frank Lockhart in a Miller followed by Cliff Woodbury in a Boyle Valve Miller and Ira Vale in the Lockhart Miller.

 

 June 12, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  10,000

Car:  White, blue & red, 91-cubicinch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury.

Finish:  Petticord competed in both the 10-mile heat race, won by Bruce Miller who was driving a front-wheel-drive Miller; and the 50-mile final race, won by ‘Dutch’ Baumann, who was driving a Fronty Ford owned by Arthur Chevrolet, but the only mention of Petticord in the published race results is “Cliff Bergere of Hollywood, Cal., who was ninth in this year’s Indianapolis 500-mile grind, Jack Petticord of Los Angeles, and Fred Frame of Fresno, Cal., all newcomers to Roby fans, were outclassed by the local stars.”

 

June 19, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Kalamazoo Fairgrounds at Kalamazoo, Michigan – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  White, blue & red, 91-cubic inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Third in the 100-mile race behind Fred Frame driving a Miller special and George Souders who was driving the same Duesenberg that he had won the Indianapolis 500 in, less than one month earlier.

 

July 4, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Langhorne Speedway at Langhorne, Pennsylvania – Sanctioned by A.A.A. 6

Attendance:  Over 10,000

Car:  White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch., #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Fourth in a 10-mile heat race won by Fred Winnai who was driving a #9 Duesenberg.

Fourth the 25-mile final race behind Fred Winnai who was driving a #9 Duesenberg, Ray Keech (substituting for Zeke Myers) who was driving a Miller and Wilbur Shaw.  Petticord protested the finishing order of this race when it was first announced, contending that he had finished in second place behind Winnai.  “Dutch” Bauman’s car owner, Arthur Chevrolet, also protested the originally announced finishing order of this race contending that Bauman had won that race.  After due deliberation, both protests were denied by A.A.A and the original finishing order stood as it had been originally announced.

 

 July 10, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  6,000

Car:  Originally entered to drive a Frontenac but changed before race day to the white, blue & red, 91-cubicinch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Third in the 75-mile feature race behind George Souders, driving a Duesenberg and Shorty Carlton also driving a Duesenberg.  Petticord was in second place with two laps remaining, when he had to stop to change a sparkplug.

 

July 17, 1927 – ½ mile dirt oval – Lake County Fairgrounds at Crown Point, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Miller special

Finish:  No results of these races have been located to date.

 

 July 24, 1927 – ½ mile dirt oval – Winchester Speedway at Winchester, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  White, blue & red, 91-cubicinch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  The 20-mile final race was won by Wilbur Shaw in the Miller Frontenac over George Souders in a Duesenberg and Billy Arnold in the Talamont Rajo.

 

August 7, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway in Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:   White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Only one 20-lap race, won by Wilbur Shaw, had been completed when rain caused the remainder of these races to be postponed until August 28, 1927.

 

August 21, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Fort Miami Speedway in Maumee, Ohio – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:   White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Petticord was one of the eight drivers who did not finish this 100-mile race won by Frank Lockhart.  Louis Schneider finished second, Wilbur Shaw finished third and Dave Evans finished in fourth place.

 

August 28, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway in Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:   White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  Louis Schneider won the 20-mile final race in a Miller followed by Dutch Bauman in a Frontenac and Wilbur Shaw in the Miller Frontenac.

 

September 3, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – New York State Fairgrounds in Syracuse, New York – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:   White, blue & red, 91-cubic-inch, #22 Boyle Valve Miller special built in 1923 and owned by Cliff R. Woodbury

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  The 100-mile race was won by Frank Lockhart in a Miller followed by Louis Schneider, also driving a Miller, and Ira Vail who was driving the Lockhart Miller.

 

            Board racetracks seemed to be springing up all across the country in the 1920s and the Boyle Valve racing team felt the board tracks would be the wave of the future.  They decided to change their focus to concentrate on the board tracks and the Indianapolis 500 going forward.  To aid in that effort, Cliff Woodbury added drivers Billy Arnold, Fred Comer, Pete DePaolo and Dave Evans to the Boyle Valve racing team.  He also released Petticord from the team claiming that Jack was better suited to race on dirt than he was on other track surfaces.

 

 

Jack Petticord raced this black & red #1 Miller ‘183’ on Midwestern dirt racetracks in October of 1930 for car owner Leslie “Bugs” Allen of Chicago.  That is “Bugs” Allen, the taller man in the car with his riding mechanic, J. C. Smithson, who is seated on the right side of the car.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

 

September 9, 1927 – ½ mile dirt oval – Nebraska State Fairgrounds in Lincoln, Nebraska – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Fronty Ford special

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.

 

September 25, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Randall Park Track in North Randall, Ohio – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Fronty Ford #12

Finish:  Dropped out on the 39th lap of the scheduled 100-lap distance due to rain.  The race was won by Frank Lockhart in a Miller special followed by Wilbur Shaw in the Miller Frontenac, Ralph DePalma who was also driving a Miller special and Shorty Cantion who was driving a Fronty Ford.

 

October 2, 1927 – 1 mile dirt oval – Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at West Allis, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Fronty Ford

Finish:  Fifth in the 17-car, 100-lap race that was stopped after 56 laps due to rain.  Louis Schneider, driving a Miller, was declared winner of the shortened race followed by Roy Goodwin in the Loomis special and Shorty Cantlon in the Miller Frontenac.  

 

November 27, 1927 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  #22 Miller/Sievers special that had been built in 1926 by Al Sievers, Sr. and his son, Al Sievers, Jr.

Finish:  Did not start due to an oil leak.  The 25-lap feature race was won by George Souders who finished ahead of Fred Frame and Leon Duray, all three of whom were driving Millers.

 

December 18, 1927 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Probably the #1 Frosty special owned by Roland Frost

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.  The 50-lap main event was won by Leon Duray who was followed by Fred Frame and Ralph DePalma, all three of whom were driving Millers.

 

January 15, 1928 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  7,000

Car:  #1 Frosty special owned by Roland Frost

Finish:  Second behind Lou Moore in the 8-car, 15-lap feature race for light cars.

 

February 12, 1928 5/8 mile high banked, oiled dirt oval – Ascot Speedway at Lincoln Heights, California – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Attendance:  6,000

Car:  #1 Frosty special owned by Roland Frost

Finish:  Fourth in the 12-car, 100-lap feature race behind Lou Moore, who was driving a Miller special owned by Chick Houston; Babe Stapp, who was also driving a Miller special; and Chet Gardner.  Fifth place went to Ernie Triplett as only 5 drivers finished the race.

 

June 16, 1929 – 1 mile dirt oval – Aurora Downs at North Aurora, Illinois – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Car:  Miller special owned by M. A. “Ed” Yagle

Finish:  “Jack Petticord, who piloted (Ray) Keech’s Miller special… (failed) to place among the winners.”  Billy Arnold, driving a Miller special, won the 10-mile Atlantic Hotel trophy feature race.  Louis Schneider placed second, also in a Miller special.

  

August 17, 1929 – 1 mile dirt oval – Scott County Fairgrounds at Davenport, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published race results.

 

Lou Moore won the unofficial A.A.A. Southwest Pacific Coast Winter Championship in 1929 and Petticord has been credited as finishing in tenth place although he did not compete in all of the races.7

Jack Petticord was married to Miss Eva Juanita Buis on September 18, 1929 in Clay County, Illinois and the newlyweds made their home in Chicago.  Jack and Eva had one son, Harold Jack “Jackie” Petticord, who was born on August 26, 1930 in Bloomington, Illinois.

  

August 26-28, 1930 – ½ mile dirt oval – Valley County Fairgrounds at Ord, Nebraska – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results.

 

August 31, 1930 – 1 mile dirt oval – Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Nebraska

Car:  Miller Products special

Finish:  Fourth in time trials.

Second in first 5-mile heat race.        

Won the second 5-mile heat race.

Third in 15-mile main event behind a yellow #4 Frontenac owned by John Bagley and driven by Bert Ficken (both from Omaha, Nebraska) and a blue #26 Clemons special owned and driven by Art Withrow of St. Louis, Missouri.         

  

September 7, 1930 – 1 mile dirt oval – Franklin County Fairgrounds at Franklin, Nebraska

Finish:  Results of these races have yet to be located.

 

September 14, 1930 – 1 mile dirt oval – Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Nebraska

Cars:  Miller Products special and a Clemons

Finish:  Dropped out of the first heat race with engine trouble in the Miller Products special.

Took over the Clemons of John Bolilng and won the second, 4-mile heat race.

Did not finish in the top three in the 15-mile main event that was won by Howard “Speed” Adams in the Kinsey Frontenac.

 

September 21, 1930 – 1 mile dirt oval – Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Nebraska

Finish:  Not listed in the limited published results of these races that have been found to date but he did not finish in the top three in the 15-mile main event that was won by Sam Hoffman..

 

October 5, 1930 – 1 mile dirt oval – Ak-Sar-Ben at Omaha, Nebraska

Car:  Black & red #1 Miller ‘183’ owned by Leslie “Bugs” Allen of Chicago, Illinois

Finish:  Started third and finished third in the fast heat race behind a yellow #4 owned by John Bagley and driven by Bert Ficken (both from Omaha, Nebraska) and a blue #26 Clemons special owned and driven by Art Withrow of St. Louis, Missouri.

Started third and finished third in the feature race behind a yellow #4 Frontenac owned by John Bagley and driven by Bert Ficken (both from Omaha, Nebraska) and a blue #26 Clemons special owned and driven by Art Withrow of St. Louis, Missouri.        

 Note:  Petticord started these races at Ak-Sar-Ben on the outside of the front row as they were each three-abreast starts.

 

 

 

 

Jack Petticord

in 1934

 

October 12, 1930 – ½ mile dirt oval – Creve Coeur Lake Speedway a.k.a. the Greater St. Louis Speedway at Upper Creve Coeur, Missouri 8

Car:  Black & red #1 Miller ‘183’ owned by Leslie “Bugs” Allen of Chicago, Illinois

Finish:  Howard “Speed” Adams won the 20-lap Sweepstakes race.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

                 

October 19, 1930 – ½ mile dirt oval – Creve Coeur Lake Speedway a.k.a. the Greater St. Louis Speedway at Upper Creve Coeur, Missouri 9

Car:  Black & red #1 Miller ‘183’ owned by Leslie “Bugs” Allen of Chicago, Illinois

Finish:  Bryan Saulpaugh, driving the Howe Hisso #100 owned by Bill Howe, won the 20-lap Sweepstakes race.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

Note:  Petticord was also entered to drive a Miller special in races at Amarillo, Texas on this same date but no results of those races have been located to date so, it remains unclear just where he raced on this date or how he finished in those races.

 

May 24, 1931 – ½ mile dirt oval – Manitowoc Fairgrounds at Manitowoc, Wisconsin

Car:  Modal “A” Ford

Finish:  Second in the final event behind Archie Powell who drove the Dixie special

 

May 30, 1931 – ½ mile dirt oval – Manitowoc Fairgrounds at Manitowoc, Wisconsin

Attendance:  3,000

Car:  Fronty Ford

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in published results of these races.  The final race for the Dixie Oil Cup was won by Archie Powell.

  

June 14, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at West Allis, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Won the second 5-mile race.

            Petticord did not finish in the top three in the 50-mile main event that was won by Johnny Sawyer who was driving a Miller.

 

 July 12, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Races postponed until July 19, 1931 due to rain.

 

 July 19, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Races postponed until July 26, 1931 due to rain.

 

 July 26, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  Wilbur Shaw won two 5-mile heat races and the 15-mile feature race but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published race results.

 

August 9, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at West Allis, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Fronty Ford special

Finish:  Third in the second 5-mile heat race

Petticord did not finish in the top three in the 25-mile main event that was won by Frank Brisko who was driving a Miller.

 

Jack Petticord (seated on the left side of the car) with his riding mechanic, Fred Langdon, pose in the #52 Don Hulbert V-8 Ford special in the pit area along the front straightaway of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in May of 1934.

Kirkpatrick photo from the Larry Korgal collection

 

Jack Petticord posed on the start / finish line at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in May of 1934.  Petticord’s “seatmate” (a.k.a. riding mechanic) was Fred Langdon.

Indianapolis Star photo

August 16, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Aurora Downs at North Aurora, Illinois – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  12,000 +

Finish:  Second in the 3-mile International Championship race that was won by Archie Powell of Galesburg, Illinois who was driving a Frontenac

 

August 22, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Aurora Downs at North Aurora, Illinois – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Won the third 3-mile heat race over Archie Powell who was driving a Frontenac, in 2:27.0.

              Won the final 5-mile heat race over Archie Powell in 4:05.0

            Won the 4-mile Invitational Challenge race over John Sawyer in 3:21.75

 

August 28, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  25,000

Car:  Chevrolet special

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in published results of these races

    

August 29, 1931 – 1 dirt oval – Dane County Fairgrounds at Madison, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  3,000

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  First in time trials with one lap of 46.0 seconds

First in the 3-mile first heat race in 3:44.8 after passing King Brady in the last few inches of the race

First in 3-mile Invitational race in 2:30.6

First in the 5-mile Wisconsin Derby in 4:19.2 after Petticord led the entire race.

 

August 30, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Was not one of the top ten finishers in the 100-mile race that was won by Bill Cummings who was driving the Howe Hisso.

 

September 4, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Chevrolet special

Finish:  Petticord did not place in any of the races run on this afternoon

  

September 5, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  Won the third 5-mile heat race

                Did not finish in the top three positions in the 5-mile feature race which was won by Frank Brosko.

  

September 7, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Mason City Fairgrounds at Mason City, Iowa

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  Won the first 5-lap heat race in 2:57.0

Third in the 4-lap Invitational Challenge race behind Swan Peterson, who was driving a Duesenberg, and Joe Russo, who was driving the Belmond special

 

September 9, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Fred Langdon 14

 was Jack Petticord’s riding mechanic when this photo was taken at Indianapolis in May of 1934.

Kirkpatrick photo from the Larry Korgal collection

Finish:  Won the first heat race

 

September 12, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  Second in the second 10-lap heat race

            Won the 10-lap consolation race.

            Did not finish in the top four of the 20-lap feature race which was won by Frank Brisko.

 

September 17-18, 1931 – ½ dirt oval – South Dakota State Fairgrounds at Huron, South Dakota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

September 27, 1931 – 1 mile dirt oval – Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  Bert Ficken won three of the eight races run on this day including the championship feature race but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

                Note:  Petticord also entered a Clements special in a race run at Savannah, Missouri on this same date but his name does not appear in the results of those races either so it is unclear just where he did race, or how he finished on this date.

 

October 7, 1931 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mid-South Fairgrounds at Memphis, Tennessee

Car:  Miller special owned by Joe Lencki of Chicago, Illinois 10

Finish:  The car that Petticord was driving “leaped the steel cable railings and caught him.  Although hurt often in his 20 years of driving, it was the first major injury Raimey had suffered.” 11  Or as quoted from another source, “Jack Petticord and John Raimey were seriously injured when Petticord’s car crashed into a fence behind which Raimey was standing.  Three other people received less serious injuries.”

 

Since Petticord was still recuperating from the injuries he suffered at Memphis, Joe Lencki signed Dick Kroger (or Kroeger) to drive his Miller effective with a race at Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana on May 8, 1932.  In the sixth race of the day, the Lencki-owned Miller collided with another car and overturned several times.  Kroger was thrown from the car and died later that week from his injuries.  The press of the day only confused matters when they reported that Kroger had been killed in “Jack Petticord’s car.”  Although it was the car that Petticord had been driving prior to his accident at Memphis, the Miller actually belonged to Joe Lencki.

  

October 1, 1932 – ½ mile dirt oval – Mid-South Fairgrounds at Memphis, Tennessee

Finish:  The following quote is from the book, “Who’s Who in Auto Racing” published at Chicago, Illinois in 1936:

“Jack is an old-timer and is well known all the way from Ascot to Indianapolis on the country’s larger tracks.  Petticord established many track records, particularly on the dirt circuits of the Middle West, and the other drivers always found him a dangerous competitor.  He was a skillful and heady driver who, despite his years of driving, figured in only one major accident. (sic)  In 1932 at Memphis, Tenn., he tried to pass Frank Sands at the finish line.  His car struck a hidden drain and, as the wheel dropped, he lost control and rolled over several times.  This cost him four months in the hospital but as soon as he was released, Jack appeared back on the tracks ready to drive again.” 12

 

 

Jack Petticord driving this 1933 Ford V-8 roadster #6 owned by J. Gordon Burnette, to the starting line just before the start of the Elgin Road Race at Elgin, Illinois on August 26, 1933.  Each of the cars in competition that day carried two people but it is unknown who was riding with Petticord or what his function was.

Ford Motor Company photo

 

August 26, 1933 – 8½ mile road course – Elgin Road Course at Elgin, Illinois

Attendance:  33,000

Car:  1933 Ford V-8 roadster #6 owned by J. Gordon Burnette

Finish:  Petticord started 11th in a field of 15 cars.  The race was 203.2 miles in length and Petticord averaged 79.54 m.p.h. while leading the first half.  He and Fred Frame then swapped the lead back and forth before Frame finally assumed the lead for good.  Petticord finished in third place after he was passed by Lou Moore late in the race.  Petticord averaged 78.17 m.p.h. for the whole race, finished four minutes behind the leader and collected $750 for his third-place finish.  Only eight cars finished this race.

 

May 30, 1934 – 2½ mile brick oval – Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Car:  #52 Don Hulbert V-8 Ford special owned by Don Hulbert of Chicago, Illinois 13

Qualifying:  Failed to qualify.  Not only did he miss the race, Petticord was suspended indefinitely by A.A.A. on May 26, 1934.

 

August 19, 1934 – ½ mile dirt oval – Cook County Fairgrounds at Chicago, Illinois – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  Maynard Clark won the feature race in a Gerber special owned by John Gerber, but Petticord’s name does not appear in the incomplete race results that have been located to date..

 

January 3, 1935 – 1/8 mile dirt oval – International Amphitheater in Chicago, Illinois – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Car:  Midget

Finish:  Jimmy Snyder of Chicago, won the 20-lap feature race but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

June 21, 1936 – ½ dirt oval – Wisconsin State Fairgrounds at West Allis, Wisconsin – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  The 40-mile main event was won by Frank McGurk but Petticord’s name does not appear in the limited race results that have been located to date.

 

October 18, 1936 – 1 mile dirt oval – New Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

 

#12 Eugene Haustein, at left, and #6 Jack Petticord, at right (both driving 1933 Ford V-8 roadsters) made up the 6th of 8 rows of starters at the Elgin Road Race at Elgin, Illinois on August 26, 1933.  Each row started the race at 30 second intervals.  Petticord finished the race in 3rd place after leading the first half of the race.  Haustein finished in 4th place, 9.5 seconds behind Petticord.

Ford Motor Company photo

 

Finish:  This race was postponed until October 25, 1936.

 

October 25, 1936 – 1 mile dirt oval – New Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Finish:  This race was postponed until November 1, 1936 due to rain.

 

November 1, 1936 – 1 mile dirt oval – New Roby Speedway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A.

Entry:  Thirty drivers were entered in this 100-mile race and Petticord was one of ten of those drivers who were from Chicago.  This race was canceled and the racetrack closed permanently.  The official reason given was that the grandstand had been condemned but the actual cause of the permanent closing is believed to have been related to litigation over a couple of recent accidents involving the Jeter Hisso, the first of which caused the death of driver Ray Pixley.

 

May 30, 1938 – 2½ mile brick oval – Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana – Sanctioned by A.A.A

Car:  #56 Clemons Independent Suspension Indy car that Petticord purchased from Fred E. Clemons for Johnny Seymour of Springfield, Massachusetts to drive and Petticord’s own #57 which was a 93-cubic-inch, 8-cylinder Miller-Duesenberg Indy car

Drivers:  Johnny Seymour and Jack Petticord

Qualifying:  Both cars failed to qualify

 

A.A.A. officials learned of Jack Petticord’s plans to leave the A.A.A. and compete in I.M.C.A. sanctioned races beginning with the fifth annual Gold Cup Classic run at the Iowa State Fairgrounds in Des Moines, Iowa on June 5, 1938.  Either Petticord withdrew his entry in the Gold Cup Classic, found someone else to drive his car, or he didn’t place, as his name does not appear in published results of the Gold Cup Classic.

   

June 11, 1938 – 1¼ dirt oval – New Altoona Speedway at Tipton, Pennsylvania – Sanctioned by Central States Racing Association (C.S.R.A.)

Attendance:  18,100

Car:  #44 Duesenberg.  “(Petticord, from) Chicago, (was) a familiar figure on the old Altoona boards.15  He will be driving the same car, a twin to that once driven by the famous Tommy Milton, which he piloted here in board track contests.  The car has been completely remodeled.”  This is believed to have been a car that Petticord owned himself.

Qualifying:  51.91 seconds which was only good for the last starting position in the 22-car field.

Finish:  George “Joie” Chitwood won the 100-mile race followed by Jimmy Wilburn, Morris Musick, Mike Salay, Larry Evans, Dave Wilt, Gus Schrader, Duke Dinsmore, Elbert Booker and Shorty Drexler.  The remainder of the finishing order was not given in the published race results except for a notation that Bud Walker, Deb Snyder, Buford “Doc” Shanebrook, Everett Saylor, Spider Webb and Red Allen were non-finishers.  That would indicate that Petticord’s car was running at the end of the race and that he placed possibly as high as 11th place, or as low as 16th place.

 

July 3, 1938 – 1 mile dirt oval – Syracuse State Fairgrounds at Syracuse, New York – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #91 Duesenberg

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the fragmented race results that have been located to date.

 

July 24, 1938 – 5/8 mile paved oval – Hammond Raceway at Hammond, Indiana – Sanctioned by C.S.R.A.

Finish:  Petticord did not finish in the top five in the 25-mile main event which was won by Johnny McDowell who was driving the O’Day Offy.

 

 

Youngsters Ready to Go After Schrader on Oval

Mason City (Iowa) Globe Gazette

August 10, 1938

Page 15

Another oldster in the thrilling speed sport joined hands with (Gus) Schrader, Wednesday (August 14, 1938), in the defense against youth.  He was Jack Petticord, of New York, a veteran of nearly 2,000 16 dirt track contests and three Indianapolis 500-mile speedway rides.  Called “Iron Man” by his younger opponents, Petticord has spent more than 20 years at the wheel of high speed motors.  During his career, he has defeated almost every great driver of prominence including Eddie Hearne, Frank Lockhart, Sig Haugdahl and many others.  His most important victory was scored over such performers when he won the San Francisco Diamond Jubilee 150-mile race in 1926.17  He finished second (sic) to Fred Frame in the last Elgin, Ill. road race, a revival of the old time annual event staged in 1933.

 

August 14, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Mason City Fairgrounds at Mason City, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #44 Duesenberg.  This is believed to have been a car that Petticord owned himself.

Attendance:  “more than 7,000”

Finish:  Gus Schrader won the 10-lap Hawkeye Championship final.  Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.  He also entered a Duesenberg in I.M.C.A. sanctioned races to be run at the Mississippi Valley Fair at the Scott County Fairgrounds at Davenport, Iowa which were scheduled to be run on this same date but his name does not appear in the results of those races either.

 

At this point in the 1938 racing season, Jack Petticord was tied with 12 other drivers for 20th place in the I.M.C.A. season point standings.  He also placed 18th in a driver popularity pole with the racing fans that was conducted by I.M.C.A.  Gus Schrader led in both the season point standings and the popularity pole.

 

August 26, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  23,000 fans viewed the races and there were 48 race cars in the pits.

Car:  #44 Duesenberg.  “Petticord will wheel a newly built special originally entered in the 500-mile classic at Indianapolis, Ind.”  This is believed to have been a car that Petticord owned himself.

Finish:  Gus Schrader won the 10-lap final race of the day driving an Offenhauser powered car but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

 

August 28, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Iowa State Fairgrounds at Des Moines, Iowa – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Attendance:  20,000 fans were in the grandstands and 44 race cars were in the pits.

Car:  #44 Duesenberg.  “Petticord will wheel a newly built special originally entered in the 500-mile classic at Indianapolis, Ind.”  This is believed to have been a car that Petticord owned himself.

Finish:  Emory Collins won the 20-lap feature race in, an Offenhauser powered car, on this afternoon but Petticord’s name does not appear in the published results of these races.

  

September 3, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Car:  #44 Duesenberg that is believed to have been owned by Petticord

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the incomplete results of these races that have been located to date.  The 10-mile main event was won by Gus Schrader.

 

September 5, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the incomplete results of these races that have been located to date.  The 5-mile main event was won by Emory Collins.

 

September 7, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the incomplete results of these races that have been located to date.  The 10-mile main event was won by Ben Shaw.

 

September 10, 1938 – ½ dirt oval – Minnesota State Fairgrounds at St. Paul, Minnesota – Sanctioned by I.M.C.A.

Finish:  Petticord’s name does not appear in the incomplete results of these races that have been located to date.  The 50-mile main event was won by Emory Collins.

 

Petticord had spent much of his racing career competing in either I.M.C.A.’s “light car” class, or in A.A.A.’s “B” class races for which he could not earn championship points.  The only championship points paying race he competed in was the 1927 Indianapolis 500 which was sanctioned by A.A.A. and, even then, he did not finish well enough in that event to be awarded any championship points.

Jack Petticord and his small family moved to New York City early in the summer of 1938 but they had returned to Chicago at the end of that year.  Petticord retired from racing after 1938 and he, with a partner, went into the trucking business in Chicago.

Suffering from tuberculosis, Eva Petticord moved from Chicago into the Fairview Sanatorium at Normal, Illinois in 1939 to be closer to her parents’ home in Bloomington, Illinois.

Jack Petticord passed away unexpectedly in Chicago after suffering a massive stroke on January 2, 1940.  His funeral was held in Wichita, Kansas with the Thomas Hopkins Post of the American Legion officiating.  Pallbearers were members of the infantry unit that he served with in World War I.  He is buried beside his two brothers in an adjoining plot with the graves of their parents in the northwest section of Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

Eva Petticord passed away at the sanatorium on June 5, 1940 and is buried in the East Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery at Bloomington, Illinois.

After the deaths of his parents, then 9-year-old Jackie Petticord divided his time between residing with his maternal grandparents in Bloomington and his paternal grandmother in Wichita.  He attended school both places in different years.

By the Fall of 1947, Jackie was leader of “Jack Petticord’s Orchestra”18 entertaining at parties and other events in the Bloomington area.  He was also playing in a drum trio called “We Three.”

In 1948, Jackie graduated from Bloomington High School and joined the United States Army at Fort Devens, Massachusetts that Fall.  He immediately began playing any of several instruments in the army post band.  He also joined a dance orchestra that played dates in the Boston area.

On August 13, 1949, Jackie was detached from the army post band and ordered to South Korea.

On September 3, 1950, Harold Jack Petticord became the first graduate of Bloomington High School to die in combat in the Korean War when he was killed near Taegu, South Korea by small arms fire while serving as a light weapons infantryman with the 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division.  He was awarded a Purple Heart, Combat Infantry Badge, Korean Service Medal with one Service Star, United Nations Service Medal, Korean Presidential Unit Citation and a National Defense Service Medal.  Jack is also buried in the East Lawn Memorial Gardens Cemetery at Bloomington, Illinois.

 

 

 

 

 

This photo was taken c1936

Front row, left to right:  Harry McQuinn, Fay Gardner, Joie Chitwood, John Bagley and Tex West.

Back row, left to right:  A.A.A. starter Harvey LaBounty, Chelsie Johnson?, Ben Musick, John Gerber, George Barringer and Jack Petticord.  The body language by, and by those around Petticord in this photo appears to say a lot.

Larry Sullivan photo

 

Footnotes:

 

1 Jack Petticord competed in the races on this date using his given name (Harold) as he had not picked up the nicknames “Jack” or “Iron Man” yet.

 

2 The International Motor Contest Association (I.M.C.A.) did not formally recognize any driving champions of the races they sanctioned as early as 1923 however, there is no record of anyone disputing Petticord’s claim to the title nor is there any evidence of anyone else trying to lay claim to the title.

 

3 Jack Petticord was also entered in a race at Winchester, Indiana on this same date but, since he was racing at Rochester, New York, he obviously did not make it to the race in Indiana.

 

4 This is one of three cars entered in these races by Dewitt J. Brady, a Ford dealer from Caulker City, California.  The other two was the #21 Brady special driven by Mel Kenealy and a #25 Frontenac driven by Babe Stapp.

 

5 Petticord’s racing career had a bright future until he was involved in this crash at Ascot Speedway on July 10, 1926.  From this point on, his racing career suffered until his retirement from the sport.  Although he continued to land rides in good equipment for a year, or so, victories were few and far between as he was never able to regain the performance level he had once enjoyed.  When this became apparent to car owners, it became increasing difficult for him to find competitive equipment to race.

 

6 The West Texas Speedway at Abilene, Texas ran newspaper ads claiming that Jack Petticord would be among the drivers appearing at the races there on July 4, 1927.  Instead, Petticord chose to race in the races sanctioned by American Automobile Association (A.A.A.) at Langhorne Speedway at Langhorne, Pennsylvania on that date.  Petticord was entered to drive Harry Milburn’s ex-White Miller in the races in Texas so the entry was he probably posted prior to the Indianapolis 500, more in hope than in expectation that Petticord would actually race Milburn’s car there.

 

7 The 1928/1929 A.A.A. Southwest Pacific Coast winter racing season was almost an entirely local affair, with only one "outsider" of any prominence (Johnny Sawyer), and three locals with experience and success outside of the region (Ernie Triplett, Bill Spence and Francis Quinn).  The season consisted of 12 mostly short races, seven of them at Ascot Speedway, two at the Arizona State Fairgrounds at Phoenix, Arizona and one each at Fresno, San Jose and Banning, all in California.  The official race results being far from complete, auto racing historian Michael Ferner compiled a “virtual season’s standings” from his own computations “based on a simple scoring method (race distance in miles divided through finishing position”).  By that generally accepted method, the standings for that season would have been: (1) Lou Moore, (2) George Souders, (3) Leon Duray, (4) Chet Gardner, (5) Babe Stapp, (6) Fred Frame, (7) Glenn Hiett, (8) Ralph DePalma, (9) Cliff Bergere, (10) Jack Petticord, (11) Ernie Triplett and (12) Louie Schneider.  The car that Petticord drove in this unofficial series is believed to have been owned by “Hollywood” Bill White.

 

8 Veteran race promoter, Don C. Olney, applied for an A.A.A. sanction for these races but, as was not unusual, the official sanction had not arrived by race time.  Petticord and others went ahead and entered these races.  Several serious accidents occurred during the events resulting in two drivers (Ralph Marley and Floyd Davis) being seriously injured.  A.A.A. officials on the scene said that Olney’s application had been received but that no sanction had been issued for the races and none would have been issued as the racetrack had not been specifically built for auto racing.  Therefore, it is unclear if Petticord, or other A.A.A. licensed drivers, would have been eligible to compete.  Newspaper stories the next day described the accidents in detail but did not list the race results (except for the winner of the 20-lap Grand Sweepstakes race, Howard “Speed” Adams), so it is unclear if Petticord actually competed in these races, or not.

 

9 Petticord was also entered to drive his own Miller in races at Tri-State Speedway at Amarillo, Texas on this date.  Obviously, he could not be at two different racetracks in two different states at once but no his name does not appear in the published race results of the races at Amarillo and the results of the races at Creve Coeur Lake Speedway at Creve Coeur, Missouri have yet to be located.

 

10 Until Petticord began driving for Joseph L. “Joe” Lencki (1903-1994) in 1931, Lencki had done quite well racing his Miller himself.  He went on to invent “Speedway Cocktail”, an engine oil additive, in 1936.  Today, that is known as zMAX.  Lencki also invented the Lencki Six racing engine in 1938 that ran in the Indianapolis 500 several times beginning in 1939.

 

 

Harold Jack “Jackie” Petticord

in 1947

Bloomington Paragraph

 

11 ”him” refers to John R. “Johnny” Raimey (1880-1964), the very same veteran race car driver with whom Petticord had first gotten his start in auto racing more than 10 years earlier.  Raimey had retired from driving in 1923 after having participated in the sport for 20 years.  In retirement, Raimey promoted auto races in the Memphis, Tennessee area and was working as a timekeeper at the races on this day.  Petticord’s errant car caused serious injury to Raimey resulting in the amputation of one of his legs.

  

12 Jack Petticord had a reputation of not being involved in many wrecks but, the ones he was involved in seemed to be real doozies!

 

13 Chicago Ford dealer Don Hulbert got Floyd “Pop” Dreyer to build this 220-cubic-inch, V-8 Ford powered car in 1934.  An article on page 25 of the May 26, 1962 issue of the Lafayette, Indiana Journal and Courier states that Petticord even drove the new race from Chicago to Indianapolis for the race that year.  The car was sold to brothers Andy, Joe and Vince Granatelli in 1946 and they installed eight JATO rockets in the tail for Andy to run in shows around the country.  The car still exists today and has been run in the Great American Race by Gary Kuck and Rex Gardner.

 

14 Fred Langdon is believed to have been Fred Leroy Langdon (1902-1970), a garage mechanic from St. Clair County, Missouri.  With Petticord’s failure to qualify in 1934, it is believed that Fred never did get a chance to ride along with a driver in the Indianapolis 500.

 

15 Several instances have been located stating that Petticord raced often on board tracks, yet not even a single instance has been found where he actually did do so.

 

16 While Petticord raced extensively in both I.M.C.A. and A.A.A. sanctioned events, most of the races he competed in with I.M.C.A. were for “light car” races with smaller engines which did not received nearly the media attention that the headlining, heavier cars with larger engines received.  When Petticord competed in A.A.A. races, those appearances were primarily in Big Cars (later known as sprint cars) which ran as support races for the A.A.A. Championship Car series and, thus, his appearances, or how he finished in those races, were often ignored by the media of that day.  That accounts for the fact that, while he raced in both professional and outlaw (non-sanctioned) events all over the United States and Canada for nearly 20 years, only a small number of the results of those races have been located to date although 2,000 races may be a bit of an exaggeration.

 

17 It is unclear if this reference to the San Francisco Diamond Jubilee race in 1926 was actually to the 50-mile Diamond Jubilee race that Petticord won at San Mateo, California in 1925, or if it actually was a 150-mile race by that name that was won by Petticord and that more results of which have yet to be located.

 

18 No connection and totally by coincidence, there had been another “Jack Petticord and his Orchestra” playing around the Winston-Salem, North Carolina area in 1932.

 

 

 

 

Webmaster’s note:  There are 10 photographs related to Jack Petticord and his racing at the Revs Digital Library photo webpage.  Purchasing a license for the right to display those photographs here is cost prohibitive but you may view those photographs by following the link at the end of this short paragraph and scrolling about halfway down.  Clicking on each of those photos will bring up some very sketchy (and occasionally inaccurate) information about each: Revs Digital Library’s Jack Petticord photo webpage

Be sure to notice that photographs 9 and 10 on that webpage have been dated incorrectly.  Those posed photos of Jack Petticord in his #8 Miller ‘183’ with his wife and several other people nearby, were taken at Ascot Speedway on June 6, 1926.

                If you know anything more about Harold Homer. “Jack” Petticord or his career in auto racing, please contact the Webmaster at:  sprintguy @ cox.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank You to:

Jeff Adams, Michael Ferner, Darren Galpin, Larry Korgal, Katie Pott, Pam Smith, James Taggart and Kevin Triplett